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Social Sciences
#MeToo and Beyond Cover
Format: Hardback
Pages: 248
ISBN: 9780813195599
Pub Date: 26 Jul 2022
Imprint: University Press of Kentucky
#NiUnaMenos #Aufschrei #LoSHA   Before #MeToo became the massive global movement we know today, these were the hashtags that represented mobilisations from Ukraine to Latin America that demanded accountability for the intersecting experiences of sexual violence and racism, xenophobia, and misogyny inflicted on women, transgender people, and girls. Lead by activists such as Tarana Burke, who coined the phrase "me too," the movement provided a call to action for survivors across the world to speak out about their experiences.   In #MeToo and Beyond, M. Cristina Alcalde and Paula-Irene Villa bring together scholars and activists from various backgrounds to approach #MeToo from multiple spaces, positionalities, and areas of expertise, many from regions and contexts often overlooked and understudied in the mediascapes of the Global North. This volume includes perspectives from around the world and covers research spanning masculinity, to trans issues, to Jewish communities. The editors and contributors heed Tarana Burke's call to center marginalised voices and experiences so that instead of becoming a footnote, these experiences guide activists to frame polyphony as central to understanding past, current, and future forms of gendered violence and resistance.   The goal of #MeToo and Beyond is to examine both the profoundly universal and familiar experiences of sexual violence, and the specificity of these forms of violence and mobilisation against them across place, space, and experiences of participants. Activists and scholars will find this an important and necessary contribution to current and future discussions on sexual violence and global movements.
War and Homecoming Cover
Format: Hardback
Pages: 204
ISBN: 9780813195643
Pub Date: 26 Jul 2022
Imprint: University Press of Kentucky
More than 2.7 million post-9/11 veterans served in Iraq and Afghanistan. Their homecomings didn't include parades or national celebrations, but civilians regard them with reverence and pride. Veterans' benefits are comprehensive. The phrase "thank you for your service" is ubiquitous. Yet, one in ten post-9/11 veterans struggle with substance abuse. Fifteen to twenty veterans die by suicide every day, with 18-34-year-olds dying at the highest rates. These veterans carry intractable mental and physical wounds, leading advocates to focus on concepts like moral injury and collective belonging.   In War and Homecoming: Veteran Identity and the Post-9/11 Generation, Travis Martin, a scholar, teacher, and former veteran himself, argues that post-9/11 veterans struggle with homecoming because of decades of stereotyping and a lack of healthy models of veteran identity. In the American unconscious, veterans are the superficially praised ‘hero’, the victimised ‘wounded warrior’, forever defined by past accomplishments. They are appropriated as symbols in competing narratives of national identity. War and Homecoming explores past and current stereotypes often found in patriotic rhetoric, popular media, literature, and veterans' lives.   Luckily, a third type of post-9/11 veteran has emerged, the veteran ‘storyteller’ who recognises stereotypes, claims their symbolic authority, and defines who they are through literature, art, and service. This identity allows for continued growth, and these ‘storytellers’ provide examples of identity rooted in agency, individuality, and resilience for other veterans to model. New creative communities, service organisations, and the growing academic field of Veterans Studies suggest post-9/11 veterans are redefining what it means to be a veteran.
Peoplehood in the Nordic World Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 115
ISBN: 9788772197258
Pub Date: 14 Jul 2022
Imprint: Aarhus University Press
Series: The Nordic World
What do we mean when we say "the people"? In a Nordic context, the word "people" was historically associated not with members of a sovereign nation but of a household, church, or state. The term remains a battlefield of mixed or even opposing interests and has developed at least three different meanings: a political unit, a cultural entity, and a social multitude.   Modern historian Ove Korsgaard focuses on the crucial struggles over who has (or has not) belonged to the people over the past 175 years, and elucidates their implications for state and nation building in Denmark and other Nordic countries.

Critique Is Creative

The Critical Response Process® in Theory and Action

Critique Is Creative

Format: 
Pages: 266
ISBN: 9780819580825
Pub Date: 05 Jul 2022
Imprint: Wesleyan University Press
Pages: 266
ISBN: 9780819577184
Pub Date: 05 Jul 2022
Imprint: Wesleyan University Press
Devised by choreographer Liz Lerman in 1990, Critical Response Process® (CRP) is an internationally recognized method for giving and getting feedback on creative works in progress. In this first in-depth study of CRP, Lerman and her long-term collaborator John Borstel describe in detail the four-step process, its origins and principles. The book also includes essays on CRP from a wide range of contributors. With insight, ingenuity, and the occasional challenge, these practitioners shed light on the applications and variations of CRP in the contexts of art, education, and community life. Critique Is Creative examines the challenges we face in an era of reckoning and how CRP can aid in change-making of various kinds.  
Baghdad during the time of ʿAbd al-Qādir al-Jīlānī Cover
Format: Hardback
Pages: 284
ISBN: 9781463244385
Pub Date: 30 Jun 2022
Imprint: Gorgias Press
Series: Islamic History and Thought
A study of the life and background of ʿAbd al-Qādir al-Jīlānī, putative founder of the Qādiriyya order, investigating the sources for his life and attributed works. The book seeks to elucidate the ideas of al-Jīlānī, and to formulate a picture of the most prominent trends of pious and mystical thought in Baghdad during the twelfth century, providing a cultural and geographical angle to the study of Islamic mysticism and piety.
Resistance in the Bluegrass Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 272
ISBN: 9780813187204
Pub Date: 31 May 2022
Imprint: University Press of Kentucky
From the anti-segregation sit-ins of the 1960s to the protests in response to the killing of Breonna Taylor, the rest of the nation - and often the world - has watched as Kentuckians boldly fought against instances of injustice. In Resistance in the Bluegrass, Farrah Alexander outlines the ways in which Kentucky's citizens have been models in the fight against intersectional issues of racial injustice, economic inequality, education, climate change, immigration, political representation, LGBTQ+ rights, and women's rights, while exploring and celebrating decades of Kentucky's contributions to social justice movements and the names behind them.     Resistance in the Bluegrass gives engaged citizens-or those wishing to become more engaged-both inspiration and guidance on how they too can make a difference across the commonwealth. Together with interviews and issue-by-issue action items, Alexander reminds her readers that at the heart of all social change are everyday citizens who step up to make a difference. Optimistic and accessible, this people's history and guide calls Kentuckians of all backgrounds to action.
Against Racism Cover
Format: Hardback
Pages: 292
ISBN: 9780822947103
Pub Date: 28 May 2022
Imprint: University of Pittsburgh Press
Series: Pitt Latin American Series
Powerful narratives often describe Latin American nations as fundamentally mestizo. These narratives have hampered the acknowledgement of racism in the region, but recent multiculturalist reforms have increased recognition of Black and Indigenous identities and cultures. Multiculturalism may focus on identity and visibility and address more casual and social forms of racism, but can also distract attention from structural racism and racialized inequality, and constrain larger anti-racist initiatives. Additionally, multiple understandings of how racism and anti-racism fit into projects of social transformation make racism a complex and multi-faceted issue. The essays in Against Racism examine actors in Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, and Mexico that move beyond recognition politics to address structural inequalities and material conflicts and build common ground with other marginalized groups. The organizations in this study advocate an approach to deep social structural transformation that is inclusive, fosters alliances, and is inspired by a radical imagination.   "By approaching race through anti-racism, this exemplar of teamwork in social research charts a major innovation in thinking about race in Latin America and beyond. Interweaving themes, cases, and countries, race appears in social activism even when it is not named, and even when it is named it may not be the only factor building support and strategy." --David Lehmann, author of The Prism of Race: the Ideology and Politics of Affirmative Action in Brazil   "This far-ranging volume, the product of a deep and expansive collaboration among scholars based in Latin America and the global North, with different racial identifications, and belonging to different generations . . . forces us to confront complex questions with no easy answers and will have a significant impact on how race, racism, and anti-racist movements are studied, not only in Latin America but also in other parts of the world." --Joanne Rappaport, Georgetown University   "With great prescience and precision, this book captures the emerging moment in Latin America, when multifaceted anti-racist organizing has come to the fore. The project's ambitious scope and collective character--four countries, more than a dozen researchers--uncovers a central analytical challenge, which opens onto the book's central contribution. . . . The authors offer a salutary reminder of the topic's immense complexity, yet always guided by the drive to imagine and work toward societies--to evoke Stuart Hall's memorable phrase--no longer structured in racial dominance." --Charles R. Hale, University of California, Santa Barbara
Ginseng Diggers Cover
Format: Hardback
Pages: 304
ISBN: 9780813183817
Pub Date: 28 May 2022
Imprint: University Press of Kentucky
The harvesting of wild American ginseng (panax quinquefolium), the gnarled, aromatic herb known for its therapeutic and healing properties, is deeply rooted in North America, but nowhere has it played a more important role than in the southern and central Appalachian Mountains. Made possible by a trans-Pacific trade network that connected the region to East Asian markets, ginseng was but one of several medicinal Appalachian plants that entered international webs of exchange. As the production of patent medicines and botanical pharmaceutical products escalated in the mid- to late-nineteenth century, southern Appalachia emerged as the United States' most prolific supplier of many species of medicinal plants. The region achieved this distinction due to both its biodiversity and the persistence of certain common rights that guaranteed widespread access to the forested mountainsides, regardless of who owned the land.   Following the Civil War, root digging and herb gathering became one of the most important ways landless and smallholding families earned income from the forest commons. This boom influenced class relations, gender roles, forest use, and outside perceptions of Appalachia, and it began a widespread renegotiation of common rights that eventually curtailed access to some plants such as ginseng. Based on extensive research into the business records of mountain entrepreneurs, country stores, and pharmaceutical companies, Ginseng Diggers: A History of Root and Herb Gathering in Appalachia is the first book to unearth the unique relationship between the Appalachian region and the global trade in medicinal plants. Historian Luke Manget expands our understanding of the gathering commons by exploring how and why Appalachia became the nation's premier purveyor of botanical drugs in the late nineteenth century and how the trade influenced the way human residents of the region interacted with each other and with the forests around them.
Teaching Black Cover
Format: Hardback
Pages: 264
ISBN: 9780822946953
Pub Date: 28 May 2022
Imprint: University of Pittsburgh Press
Series: Composition, Literacy, and Culture
Teaching Black: The Craft of Teaching Black Life and Literature presents the experiences and voices of Black creative writers who are also teachers. The authors presented here write and teach across a variety of genres and at numerous intersections, including writers of poetry, fiction, experimental fiction, playwriting, and also from creative writers who are engaged in literary studies and criticism. Contributors from this book provide practical advice, engage with historical and theoretical questions about teaching in classrooms, workshops, and community settings. Teaching Black is for teachers and students of literature and craft in high schools, colleges, community settings, and workshops. This book is an invaluable tool for teachers, practitioners, presses, organizational leaders, and change agents who are interested in providing access to, and incorporating Black literature and conversations on Black literary craft into their own work.
The Forgotten Clones Cover
Format: Hardback
Pages: 296
ISBN: 9780822946274
Pub Date: 28 May 2022
Imprint: University of Pittsburgh Press
Series: Science, Values, and the Public
Long before scientists at the Roslin Institute in Scotland cloned Dolly the sheep in 1996, American developmental biologist and aspiring cancer researcher Robert Briggs successfully performed the technique of nuclear transplantation by cloning frog nuclei in 1952. Although the history of cloning is often associated with contemporary ethical controversies, The Forgotten Clones revisits the influential work of scientists like Briggs, Thomas King, and Marie DiBerardino, before the possibility of human cloning and its ethical implications first registered as a concern in public consciousness, and when many thought the very idea of cloning was experimentally impossible. By focusing instead on new laboratory techniques and practices and their place in Anglo-American science and society in the mid-twentieth century, Nathan Crowe demonstrates how embryos constructed in the lab were only later reconstructed as ethical problems. His book illuminates the importance of the early history of cloning for the biosciences and their institutional, disciplinary, and intellectual contexts, as well as the changing relationship between science and society after the Second World War.

An Empty Room

Imagining Butoh and the Social Body in Crisis
An Empty Room Cover
Format: 
Pages: 272
ISBN: 9780819580641
Pub Date: 03 May 2022
Imprint: Wesleyan University Press
Pages: 272
ISBN: 9780819580658
Pub Date: 03 May 2022
Imprint: Wesleyan University Press
An Empty Room is a transformative journey through butoh, an avant-garde form of performance art that originated in Japan in the late 1950's and is now a global phenomenon. This is the first book about butoh authored by a scholar-practitioner who combines personal experience with ethnographic and historical accounts alongside over twenty photos. Author Michael Sakamoto traverses butoh dance history from its roots in post-World War II Japan to its diaspora in the West in the 1970s and 1980s. An Empty Room delves into the archive of butoh dance, gathering testimony from multiple generations of artists active in Japan, the US, and Europe. The book also creatively highlights seminal visual and written texts, especially Hosoe Eikoh's photo essay, "Kamaitachi," and Hijikata Tatsumi's early essays. Sakamoto ultimately fashions an original view of what butoh has been, is and, more importantly, can be through the lens of literary criticism, photo studies, folklore, political theory, and his experience performing, photographing, teaching, and lecturing in 15 countries worldwide.
Rise Up Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 256
ISBN: 9781736690215
Pub Date: 28 Apr 2022
Imprint: International Polar Institute
Rise Up is a novel about the inequalities that Greenlanders and Faroese experience in Denmark. It is a tribute to Greenlandic and Danish politicians who attempt to heal fractures and a rebuke to the part of the Danish population that still assists in perpetuating negative stereotypes.
The Early Danish-Muscovite Treaties, 1493-1523 Cover
Format: Hardback
Pages: 189
ISBN: 9788772194059
Pub Date: 15 Apr 2022
Imprint: Aarhus University Press
In 1493, King Hans of Denmark and Grand Prince Ivan III of Moscow concluded one of the earliest treaties of alliance between a Catholic European and an Orthodox Muscovite ruler. The alliance proved viable enough to generate two further treaties and an astounding fifty-plus diplomatic missions between Copenhagen and Moscow over the next thirty years. Yet little of scholarly value has been written about this unique late-medieval relationship across a divisive religious border.   The book is intended to provide a solid foundation for a comprehensive study of the alliance. The author first goes over the peculiar customs and diplomatics of treating with medieval Russia, then proceeds to detail the diplomatic processes leading to each of the three Danish-Muscovite treaties. Further the surviving Danish and Muscovite treaty texts are published in a new critical edition with commentary and translations into English. And finally, the author reconstructs the missing originals of the treaties for a complete assembly of texts underlying the alliance.
Being Irish Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 300
ISBN: 9781838359348
Pub Date: 15 Mar 2022
Imprint: Liffey Press
What makes the Irish unique? Why do over 70 million people worldwide embrace their Irish heritage? What does it mean to be Irish today? These and other questions are addressed in this fascinating new book. Being Irish gathers a diverse group of 100 people - including well-known actors, musicians, novelists, sportspeople, journalists, political and religious leaders, community activists, asylum seekers, students and others - each trying to give expression to that special something that is more or less recognisable as Irish.  This is not a sociological study; it consists of highly personal responses to a question of identity.   Twenty-one years ago, Paddy Logue compiled the original edition of Being Irish to better understand the recent changes Ireland had undergone. Now his daughter, Derry-based solicitor Marie-Claire Logue, takes up the challenge to take a fresh look at Irishness, this time against a backdrop of Covid-19, Brexit, economic insecurity, weakening influence of the Catholic Church and a rapidly changing Northern Ireland.   The contributions come from the ranks of the famous and not so famous, people at the centre of things and people at the margins, people who live in Ireland and those who live abroad, the Irish and not-Irish-but-interested. Some delve into their personal histories to give meaning to their identities; while others rely on storytelling, humour and lyricism to approach a tentative sense of self.   Above all, the reflections in this volume show that we can be Irish by birth, Irish by ancestry, Irish by geography, Irish and British, Northern Irish, Irish by accident, Irish by necessity, Irish and European, Irish by association, Irish by culture, Irish by history, Irish and American and Irish by choice. The life stories contained herein are sure to illuminate and entertain.