Prehistory & Ancient History  /  Prehistory
Towards a Social Bioarchaeology of the Mycenaean Period Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 328
ISBN: 9781789254822
Pub Date: 06 May 2021
Imprint: Oxbow Books
This book investigates the complex relationship between funerary treatment and wider social dynamics through a contextual analysis of human skeletal remains and associated mortuary data from Voudeni, an important Mycenaean (1450-1050 BC) chamber tomb cemetery in Achaea, Greece. Voudeni is one of the most significant sites of Achaea, thoroughly investigated under the direction of the Honorary General Director of Antiquities, Dr Lazaros Kolonas. Over 60 chamber tombs, spanning the entire Late Helladic III period, have been excavated, yielding an unprecedented wealth of biocultural information. This study explores the post-mortem treatment of the body in the Voudeni cemetery, through a novel interpretive approach that transcends unproductive cross-disciplinary divisions. This biosocial approach integrates traditional archaeology, current reflections in mortuary archaeological theory and cutting-edge bioarchaeological methods, primarily focused on funerary taphonomy and archaeothanatology of commingled skeletal assemblages. The author proposes that the most effective route to explore the social dimensions of mortuary data is through an emic understanding of historically situated actions and experiences, both of the living actors, the mourners, and of the dead themselves. Human skeletal remains are used as the primary strand of evidence, both as the object of the acts of the living and the subject of their own lived experiences. Most importantly, this study aspires to show how reconciliation between abstract theoretical advances and empirical biocultural data may be possible, providing the most insightful path to a better understanding of the archaeological mortuary record.   The book provides a thorough background on Mycenaean mortuary research and explores the topic in successive stages: a) theoretical and methodological framework, b) detailed taphonomic analysis and osteological results of 20 tombs, c) multivariate analysis of bio-cultural data across socio-temporal parameters (with special emphasis on the distinction between the palatial LHIIIA-B and the transitional post-palatial LHIIIC period), and d) final synthesis, addressing questions pertaining to changing social conditions in Achaea and key issues of current Mycenaean mortuary research. These include: tomb re-use; form, diversity, sequence and frequency of mortuary activities; mortality profiles; differential inclusion, visibility and funerary treatment of different groups/identities; changes in treatment of the dead body, reflecting shifts in notions of the self and social relationships. The results shed new light on social developments in Mycenaean Achaea, showing that the complex interaction between changing social conditions and mortuary practice is often reflected in subtle, yet meaningful, shifts of emphasis in the post-mortem treatment of bodies and bones, rather than in blatant radical changes.
Death in Mycenaean Laconia Cover
Format: Hardback
Pages: 296
ISBN: 9781789252422
Pub Date: 15 Nov 2019
Imprint: Oxbow Books
A Silent Place: Death in Mycenaean Lakonia is the first book-length systematic study of the Late Bronze Age (LBA) burial tradition in south-eastern Peloponnese, Greece, and the first to comprehensively present and discuss all Mycenaean tombs and funerary contexts excavated and/or simply reported in the region from the 19th century to present day. The book will discuss and reconstruct the emergence and development of the Mycenaean mortuary tradition in Lakonia by examining the landscape of death, the burial architecture, the funerary and post-funerary customs and rituals, and offering patterns over a longue durée.   The author proposes patterns of continuity from the Middle Bronze Age (even the Early Bronze Age in terms of burial architecture) to the LBA and, equally important, from the Late Bronze Age to the Early Iron Age,and reconstructs diachronic processes of invention of tradition and identity in Mycenaean communities, on the basis of tomb types and their material culture. The text highlights the social, political and economic history of Late Bronze Age Lakonia from the evolution of the Mycenaean civilisation and the establishment of palatial administration in the Spartan vale, to the demise of Mycenaean culture and the turbulent post–collapse centuries, as reflected by the burial offerings.   The book also brings to publication the chamber tombs at Epidavros Limera that remained largely unpublished since their excavation in the 1930s and 1950s. Epidavros Limera was one of the most important prehistoric coastal sites in prehistoric southern Greece (early 3rd–late 4th millennium BC), and one of the main harbour towns of the Mycenaean administrative centres of central Lakonia. It is one of very few Mycenaean sites that flourished uninterruptedly from the emergence of the Mycenaean civilisation until after the collapse of the palatial administration and into the transition to the Early Iron Age. The present study of the funerary architecture and of the pottery from the tombs suggests that the site was responsible for the introduction of the chamber tomb type on the Greek mainland in the latest phase of the Middle Bronze Age (definitely no later than the transitional Middle Bronze Age/Late Bronze Age period), and not in the early phase of the Late Bronze Age (Late Helladic I) as previously assumed.
Woven Threads Cover
Format: Hardback
Pages: 264
ISBN: 9781785700583
Pub Date: 31 Dec 2015
Imprint: Oxbow Books
Series: Ancient Textiles
Woven textiles are produced by nearly all human societies. This volume investigates evidence for patterned textiles (that is, textiles woven with elaborate designs) that were produced by two early Mediterranean civilisations: the Minoans of Crete and the Mycenaeans of mainland Greece, that prospered during the Aegean Bronze Age, c. 3000-1200 BC, contemporary with pharaonic Egypt. Both could boast of specialists in textile production. Together with their wine, oil, and art, Minoan and Mycenaean textiles were much desired as trade goods. Artistic images of their fabrics preserved both in the Aegean and in other parts of the Mediterranean show elaborate patterns woven with rich decorative detail and colour. Only a few small scraps of textiles survive but evidence for their production is abundant and  frescoes supply detailed information about a wide variety of now-lost textile goods from luxurious costumes and beautifully patterned wall hangings and carpets, to more utilitarian decorated fabrics. A review of surviving artistic and archaeological evidence indicates that textiles played essential practical and social roles in both Minoan and Mycenaean societies.
Well Built Mycenae Fascicule 34.1 Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 65
ISBN: 9781842175286
Pub Date: 31 Dec 2012
Imprint: Oxbow Books
Series: Well Built Mycenae
Since 1890 when Sir Flinders Petrie first realised the importance of the Aegean pottery he had found in Egypt further discoveries of these wares have been noted with more than superficial interest. Early studies, however, right up to the mid 20th century, had to be based on stylistic, and thus often subjective, criteria. It is only more recently with the development of a range of scientific techniques that it has become possible to make serious attempts to ascertain the exact sources of this imported pottery. A key factor in this work has been the establishment of data banks by which to define the various possible sites of origin. Samples from Mycenae, as one of the key nodes of Late Bronze Age trade, were taken both as part of the initial programme of research by the Research Laboratory at Oxford and then in the wider projects carried out in the Laboratory of the University of California, Berkeley, by Professors Frank Asaro and Isadore Perlman and by the Department of Nuclear Chemistry of the University of Manchester. Though the results of these studies have been made public and widely used, the full details pertaining to the core area of the Argo-Corinthia have never been published. This fascicule of the Well Built Mycenae series presents for the first time the raw data as well as the statistical analyses based on it and assesses the impact of the various methods on the archaeological value of the research. Thus by giving an outline of the relation between these results and the on-going archaeological work at Mycenae and in the surrounding area we can see into which fields of study future work should be directed. Includes a DVD with accompanying material for 34.1 and all previous fascicules.
Without Having Seen the Queen Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 212
ISBN: 9789088900877
Pub Date: 31 Dec 2012
Imprint: Sidestone Press
Heinrich Schliemann (1822-1890), a shrewd trader and later in life one of the best known archaeologists of the 19th century, made many travels around the world. He recorded his experiences in several diaries. This publication is a transcription and translation of Schliemann's first travel diary: his European journey in the winter of 1846/47. This journey was his first as a commercial trader and through the diary he kept we get to know Heinrich Schliemann more as a tourist and human being than as a trader. From his new residence in Moscow he travelled to London and Paris and via Berlin back to St. Petersburg. He writes with admiration and amazement about buildings and the emerging industrialization, while indirectly he offers us a glimpse of the poverty and filthiness of that time. He describes his visits to amongst others the theatre, the British Museum, the Champs Elysées, and the Louvre. Besides the many pleasant experiences, he also mentions negative aspects such as the theft of his hat and the seasickness that plagued him during every one of his sea voyages. The original diary was written in English and French and for a small part in Italian. "Without having seen the Queen" comprises an introduction to the diary, a transcription of the diary, and a full English translation with annotations. This publication unlocks Schliemann's first travelogue and presents a unique view of his life before rising to fame as the discoverer of Troy.
Well Built Mycenae, Fasc 16/17 Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 102
ISBN: 9781842179963
Pub Date: 15 Apr 2011
Imprint: Oxbow Books
Series: Well Built Mycenae
The post-palatial period - Late Helladic IIIC - is often seen as the twilight years of Mycenean civilisation, a period of economic decline with few achievements in terms of architecture, materials or technology. Excavation in the Citadel House area at Mycenae afforded unique opportunities to explore stratified remains of this period and to define and describe its character. In this fascicule, Dr. Elizabeth French presents her full report on the remains of this period, which, sheltered within the massive 13th century BC walls, allow us to chart something of Mycenae's history in the final years of the Bronze Age. This fascicule also contains a unique account of LH IIIC pottery, stratum by stratum, incorporating a major study by Dr. Susan Sherratt, together with a wealth of illustration of pottery vessels. The account of the other objects of terracotta, metal, ivory, stone and bone helps us to better understand the cultural materials of the post-palatial period, while Gordon Hillman's account of the plant remains from the "Granary" is a significant addition to the palaeo-botanical record for the Mycenean period as a whole and one of very few for the LH IIIC period. This book, which includes a DVD containing all the data from previous fascicules and an interactive index, will be an essential reference tool for the study of the period.
Well Built Mycenae Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 55
ISBN: 9780946897841
Pub Date: 01 Dec 1995
Imprint: Oxbow Books
Series: Well Built Mycenae
The structures, building techniques, distribution of finds, function of the complex and parallels with similar sites. NO FICHE LEFT
Well Built Mycenae, Fascicule 27 Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 44
ISBN: 9780946897353
Pub Date: 01 Dec 1992
Imprint: Oxbow Books
Series: Well Built Mycenae
This fascicule describes the ground stone objects from the 1959-69 excavations at Mycenae. Don Evely describes the vases (36 complete and fragmentary pieces including `Minoan' birds' nest bowls and Mycenaean piriform jars,, fragments of rhyta and legged mortars) and other objects (inlays in valuable stones such as lapis lazuli and lapis lacedaemonius , mushroom shaped pommels, a steatite jewellery mould and other items). Curtis Runnels discusses sixteen domestic millstones.

Lindos IV, I

Format: Paperback
ISBN: 9788748004870
Pub Date: 31 Dec 1984
Imprint: Aarhus University Press