Prehistory & Ancient History  /  Ancient Near East
Byblos Cover Byblos Cover
Format: 
Pages: 300
ISBN: 9789464262216
Pub Date: 15 Mar 2024
Imprint: Sidestone Press
Pages: 300
ISBN: 9789464262209
Pub Date: 15 Mar 2024
Imprint: Sidestone Press
Byblos has played an extraordinary role in the history of the Mediterranean. From c. 3200 BC, it developed into the preeminent port of the region due to its strategic location at the foothills of the cedar forests of Mount Lebanon and its unique ties with the pharaohs of Egypt. An important religious center, Byblos was referred to as a Holy City in Hellenistic and Roman times. The city is synonymous with writing, a legacy that lives on through the Greek word for book. With a history that reaches back nearly 8900 years, this Lebanese coastal city is among the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world. Byblos: A Legacy Unearthed is the first anthology to be published on this remarkable city. This lavishly illustrated volume encompasses an extensive range of scholarly research, from the earliest archaeological expeditions to the latest discoveries. Its 43 chapters written by leading international experts, examine the city’s history from its Neolithic origins to the Medieval era. This book is a coproduction between the National Museum of Antiquities (The Netherlands) and the Ministry of Culture/Directorate General of Antiquities (Lebanon).
Style and Society in the Prehistory of West Asia Cover Style and Society in the Prehistory of West Asia Cover
Format: 
Pages: 200
ISBN: 9789464261806
Pub Date: 16 Nov 2023
Imprint: Sidestone Press
Series: Papers on Archaeology of the Leiden Museum of Antiquities
Pages: 200
ISBN: 9789464261790
Pub Date: 16 Nov 2023
Imprint: Sidestone Press
Series: Papers on Archaeology of the Leiden Museum of Antiquities
Olivier Nieuwenhuyse was a remarkable archaeologist whose work has transformed the study of later Neolithic societies in West Asia. He has inspired many colleagues and students in their own pursuit of archaeology. Through the analysis of material culture his aim was to reconstruct social meanings and practices of societies in the deep past. In this volume a series of colleagues and friends pay tribute to the scholarship of Olivier Nieuwenhuyse, who died much too young, and present a series of studies on the archaeology of Late Neolithic societies in West Asia. The volume includes a reflection on Olivier’s career in archaeology (Spoor). There are chapters on the key site of Tell Sabi Abyad, on which Olivier worked for many years, dealing with its buildings (Akkermans and Brüning), its funerary practices (Plug), and the use of bitumen at the site (Connan et al.). The next section on the book focusses on the analysis of tokens (Bennison-Chapman), figurines (Arntz, Düring), and ornaments (Belcher and Croucher), of various sites dating to the Late Neolithic in West Asia. Following this there are studies on the emergence of pottery in West Asia (Bartl, Özbal), the use of ceramic ‘husking trays’ (Balossi Restelli), and the design rules in various prehistoric pottery traditions (Bernbeck and Pollock). Finally, the last chapter presents new data on prehistoric Palmyra (Maqdissi and Ishaq). Colleagues working on Neolithic West Asia will find much of interest in this volume. We hope they will agree that this is a worthy tribute to the remarkable body of scholarship that Olivier Nieuwenhuyse has created.
From Households to Empires Cover From Households to Empires Cover
Format: 
Pages: 290
ISBN: 9789464261967
Pub Date: 18 Oct 2023
Imprint: Sidestone Press
Pages: 290
ISBN: 9789464261950
Pub Date: 18 Oct 2023
Imprint: Sidestone Press
Bradley J. Parker made numerous contributions to the field of archaeology and Assyriology on a broad array of topics spanning six millennia of archaeological history in both ancient Mesopotamia and the Andes. His varied research interests included the archaeology of empires and imperial dynamics, frontiers and borderlands, households and micro-archaeology, ethnoarchaeology, aerial drone mapping, and the politics of archaeology and nationalism. This volume contains a collection of essays from his friends, colleagues and former students that cover three broad themes: household archaeology, frontiers and borderlands, and the archaeology of empire. Our goal is to explore Bradley’s indelible legacy in the field of archaeology and how his work will contribute to academic discourses in the future.
What Does This Have to Do with Archaeology? Cover What Does This Have to Do with Archaeology? Cover
Format: 
Pages: 458
ISBN: 9789464261899
Pub Date: 14 Sep 2023
Imprint: Sidestone Press
Pages: 458
ISBN: 9789464261882
Pub Date: 14 Sep 2023
Imprint: Sidestone Press
“What Does This Have to Do with Archaeology?” is a collection of essays published on the occasion of Reinhard Bernbeck’s 65th birthday. The distinguished archaeologist Reinhard Bernbeck from the Institute of Near Eastern Archaeology at Freie Universität Berlin is an internationally highly esteemed colleague. This commemorative volume (Festschrift) reflects his great influence on many different areas of archaeological research from the Neolithic in Central Asia to contemporary archaeology in Europe. The essays are written by an international circle of colleagues who contributed scientific papers, photographs, and personal memories of joint research and scientific exchange with Reinhard Bernbeck. The book covers a wide range of subjects, from analytical discussions on ethnology, spatial theory, and digital archaeology to more practical considerations of research practices related to fieldwork, data management, and alternative modes of archaeological writing. Case studies provide insights into new investigations and re-interpretations of ancient material culture of Southwest and Central Asia. Other contributions address the political use of archaeology in the present, as well as the heritage management and the study of the most recent past.
Death at the Dunnu Cover Death at the Dunnu Cover
Format: 
Pages: 200
ISBN: 9789464261837
Pub Date: 07 Sep 2023
Imprint: Sidestone Press
Pages: 200
ISBN: 9789464261820
Pub Date: 07 Sep 2023
Imprint: Sidestone Press
During the roughly hundred years (ca. 1225 – 1125 BCE) that the Middle Assyrian dunnu at Tell Sabi Abyad was in operation, some forty-nine individuals were interred in graves of a striking diversity. In this book their burial type, location, orientation, position, grave goods and osteological data are analysed in order to generate new insights on Middle Assyrian society. Most graves appear to have been inhumation graves dug into abandoned spaces in and around the settlement. Men, women, and children were placed in mudbrick-lined cists, unlined pits, pre-existing architecture, and jars. Burial practices similar to those at Tell Sabi Abyad are found at many other Middle Assyrian sites, and suggest they were part of an overarching Middle Assyrian funerary repertoire. At the same time, Tell Sabi Abyad also contained cremation graves – a burial practice that is at odds with Mesopotamian views of the afterlife. These may belong to (Hurrian) deportees that chose to adhere to the funerary traditions of their homelands. The cremated remains were deposited in jars that were subsequently buried in the ground or buried at the place of the funeral pyre. While almost all graves contained some form of grave goods – usually consisting of items of bodily adornment and ceramic bowls placed close to the head and hands – the two graves with the most grave goods were both cremation graves. Their inventories contained sumptuous items of Middle Assyrian style and iconography, suggesting people of non-Assyrian backgrounds were just as capable of socio-economic success in Assyrian society.
Jebel Aruda: An Uruk period temple and settlement in Syria Cover Jebel Aruda: An Uruk period temple and settlement in Syria Cover
Format: 
Pages: 390
ISBN: 9789464261714
Pub Date: 17 Jul 2023
Imprint: Sidestone Press
Series: Papers on Archaeology of the Leiden Museum of Antiquities
Pages: 390
ISBN: 9789464261707
Pub Date: 17 Jul 2023
Imprint: Sidestone Press
Series: Papers on Archaeology of the Leiden Museum of Antiquities
Jebel Aruda, a prominent mountain ridge overlooking the Taqba Dam lake in northern Syria, was the location of a remarkable settlement that flourished between c. 3300 and 3100 BC during the so-called Uruk period. For the inhabitants the sacredness of this high place, evidenced by the discovery of a large temple complex, seems to have taken precedent over its impractical location far above the valley of the Euphrates River. The site was destroyed under unknown circumstances, leaving behind the spectacular remains of a well preserved temple complex and numerous houses filled with a rich collection of material culture and administrative tools such as bullae and tablets. A Dutch team excavated the site between 1972 and 1982 while the Tabqua Dam was under construction. These two volumes present the results of these excavations and subsequent research of the remains, with special emphasis on the relationship between the domestic architecture and the finds.These richly illustrated volumes aim to facilitate further research and analysis of an exceptional, short-lived Uruk period settlement, comprising domestic architecture associated with a monumental temple complex. It is intended to appeal to readers interested in Mesopotamia and ancient Syria, as well as archaeologists concerned with architectural and locational analysis in a broader perspective. Volume I presents the results of the excavation, with a discussion of the individual houses and the history of the temple buildings, together with the pottery corpus, the administrative artefacts and sealings, as well as shorter chapters on other material categories (flint, stone etc). The contents of each individual house are presented in Volume II.
Jebel Aruda: An Uruk period temple and settlement in Syria Cover Jebel Aruda: An Uruk period temple and settlement in Syria Cover
Format: 
Pages: 452
ISBN: 9789464261745
Pub Date: 17 Jul 2023
Imprint: Sidestone Press
Series: Papers on Archaeology of the Leiden Museum of Antiquities
Pages: 452
ISBN: 9789464261738
Pub Date: 17 Jul 2023
Imprint: Sidestone Press
Series: Papers on Archaeology of the Leiden Museum of Antiquities
Jebel Aruda, a prominent mountain ridge overlooking the Taqba Dam lake in northern Syria, was the location of a remarkable settlement that flourished between c. 3300 and 3100 BC during the so-called Uruk period. For the inhabitants the sacredness of this high place, evidenced by the discovery of a large temple complex, seems to have taken precedent over its impractical location far above the valley of the Euphrates River. The site was destroyed under unknown circumstances, leaving behind the spectacular remains of a well preserved temple complex and numerous houses filled with a rich collection of material culture and administrative tools such as bullae and tablets. A Dutch team excavated the site between 1972 and 1982 while the Tabqua Dam was under construction. These two volumes present the results of these excavations and subsequent research of the remains, with special emphasis on the relationship between the domestic architecture and the finds.These richly illustrated volumes aim to facilitate further research and analysis of an exceptional, short-lived Uruk period settlement, comprising domestic architecture associated with a monumental temple complex. It is intended to appeal to readers interested in Mesopotamia and ancient Syria, as well as archaeologists concerned with architectural and locational analysis in a broader perspective. Volume I presents the results of the excavation. In Volume II the contents of each individual house are listed and illustrated as discrete room assemblages, with the specific intention of making the evidence available for more detailed analysis of the relationship between material culture and architecture and to stimulate further research into aspects such as identity and the social structure of the settlement surrounding the temples.
Thirdspace in Assyrien und Urartu Cover Thirdspace in Assyrien und Urartu Cover
Format: 
Pages: 330
ISBN: 9789464280555
Pub Date: 25 May 2023
Imprint: Sidestone Press
Pages: 330
ISBN: 9789464280548
Pub Date: 25 May 2023
Imprint: Sidestone Press
Wie lässt sich Subalternität in der Vergangenheit untersuchen, wenn heute fast ausschließlich Hinterlassenschaften der Eliten erhalten sind? Warum lohnt sich eine solche Untersuchung und wo führt sie hin? Diesen Fragen wird in dem vorliegenden Buch über die Beziehung von Assyrien und Urartu im eisenzeitlichen Nordmesopotamien (ca. 9. bis 7. Jh. v.u.Z.) nachgegangen. Denn zwischen den kriegerischen Nachbarn gab es eine Vielzahl Deportierter und Kriegsgefangener, deren Erfahrungen und Leben in der Forschung bisher wenig Beachtung fanden. Dabei konnten postmoderne und postkoloniale Denker:innen aus Literaturwissenschaften, Humangeographie oder Soziologie unlängst darlegen, dass historisch oft gerade diese ausgegrenzten, vergessenen gesellschaftlichen Gruppen zum Motor von Veränderung werden.Dieses Buch reiht sich ein in einen interdisziplinären Diskurs über Subjektivierung, Produktion von (sozialem) Raum, Subalternität und Habitus, und integriert diese Konzepte in die Archäologie Westasiens. Dabei werden verschiedene Orte mittels Methoden aus dem Feld der „Archäologie der Sinne“ quantitativ und qualitativ untersucht, um auf die Grundzüge der sinnlichen Organisation Urartus und Assyriens zu schließen. Die Gegenüberstellung der so rekonstruierten sensorischen Welten geschieht vor dem Hintergrund der Frage, wie Deportierte und Kriegsgefangene nach ihrer Verschleppung die neue Umgebung wahrnahmen. Welche Auswirkungen hatte dieser abrupte Wandel der Lebensverhältnisse durch Gefangenschaft und Zwangsumsiedlung? Wie wurden die neuen, subalternen Subjektpositionen nonverbal mittels räumlicher Ordnung kommuniziert und evoziert – und gab es Stellen, an denen es durch Irritation, Missverständnis und ungeplantes Verhalten zu niedrigschwelliger Subversion kam?English abstractHow can subalternity be studied in the past when today almost exclusively the remains of the elites are preserved? Why is such an investigation worthwhile and where does it lead? These are the questions Vera Egbers explores in her book on the relationship of Assyria and Urartu in Iron Age northern Mesopotamia (c. 9th to 7th centuries BCE). For between these neighbors, who were engaged in an ongoing violent conflict, there were the numerous deportees and prisoners of war whose experiences and lives have received little attention in research to date. Yet postmodern and postcolonial thinkers from literary studies, human geography, and sociology have already demonstrated that historically it is often these marginalized, forgotten social groups that become the engine of change.This book joins an interdisciplinary discourse on subjectivation, production of (social) space, subalternity, and habitus, and integrates these concepts into the archaeology of West Asia. In doing so, various sites are examined quantitatively and qualitatively using methods from the field of the so-called archaeology of the senses, in order to infer the basic features of the sensory organization of Urartu and Assyria. The comparison of these reconstructed sensory worlds takes place against the background of the question of how deportees and prisoners of war perceived the new environment after their deportation. What were the effects of this abrupt change in living conditions due to captivity and forced resettlement? How were the new, subaltern subject positions communicated and evoked nonverbally by means of spatial organization – and were there places where low-threshold subversion occurred through irritation, misunderstanding, and unplanned behavior?