Social Sciences  /  Gender Studies

What Price Hollywood?

Gender and Sex in the Films of George Cukor
Format: Paperback
Pages: 224
ISBN: 9780813197029
Pub Date: 23 Jan 2024
Imprint: University Press of Kentucky
During the early Hollywood sound era, studio director George Cukor produced nearly fifty films in as many years, famously winning the Best Director Oscar at the 1964 Academy Awards for My Fair Lady. His collaborations with so-called difficult actresses such as Katharine Hepburn, Judy Garland, and Marilyn Monroe unsettled producers even as his ticket sales lined their pockets. Fired from Gone with the Wind for giving Vivien Leigh more screen time than Clark Gable, Cukor quickly earned a double-sided reputation as a "woman's director." While the label celebrated his ability to help actresses deliver their best performances, the epithet also branded the gay director as suitable only for work on female-centered movies such as melodramas and romantic comedies. Desperate for success after a failed drag film nearly ended his career, Cukor swore to work within Hollywood's constraints. Nevertheless, What Price Hollywood? Gender and Sex in the Films of George Cukor finds that Cukor continued to explore gender and sexuality on-screen. Drawing on a broad array of theoretical lenses, Elyce Rae Helford examines how Cukor's award-winning films—titles including My Fair Lady and The Philadelphia Story—as well as his lesser-known films engage Hollywood masculinity and gender performativity through camp, drag, and mixed genres. Blending biography with critical analysis of more than twenty-five films, What Price Hollywood? tells the story of a once-in-a-generation director who produced some of the best films in history.
#MeToo and Beyond Cover #MeToo and Beyond Cover
Format: 
Pages: 248
ISBN: 9780813195599
Pub Date: 26 Jul 2022
Imprint: University Press of Kentucky
Pages: 248
ISBN: 9780813195605
Pub Date: 26 Jul 2022
Imprint: University Press of Kentucky
#NiUnaMenos #Aufschrei #LoSHA   Before #MeToo became the massive global movement we know today, these were the hashtags that represented mobilisations from Ukraine to Latin America that demanded accountability for the intersecting experiences of sexual violence and racism, xenophobia, and misogyny inflicted on women, transgender people, and girls. Lead by activists such as Tarana Burke, who coined the phrase "me too," the movement provided a call to action for survivors across the world to speak out about their experiences.   In #MeToo and Beyond, M. Cristina Alcalde and Paula-Irene Villa bring together scholars and activists from various backgrounds to approach #MeToo from multiple spaces, positionalities, and areas of expertise, many from regions and contexts often overlooked and understudied in the mediascapes of the Global North. This volume includes perspectives from around the world and covers research spanning masculinity, to trans issues, to Jewish communities. The editors and contributors heed Tarana Burke's call to center marginalised voices and experiences so that instead of becoming a footnote, these experiences guide activists to frame polyphony as central to understanding past, current, and future forms of gendered violence and resistance.   The goal of #MeToo and Beyond is to examine both the profoundly universal and familiar experiences of sexual violence, and the specificity of these forms of violence and mobilisation against them across place, space, and experiences of participants. Activists and scholars will find this an important and necessary contribution to current and future discussions on sexual violence and global movements.
Breaking Protocol Cover
Format: Hardback
Pages: 304
ISBN: 9780813178394
Pub Date: 21 Jan 2020
Imprint: University Press of Kentucky
Series: Studies in Conflict, Diplomacy, and Peace
"It used to be," soon-to-be secretary of state Madeleine K. Albright said in 1996, "that the only way a woman could truly make her foreign policy views felt was by marrying a diplomat and then pouring tea on an offending ambassador's lap." This world of US diplomacy excluded women for a variety of misguided reasons: they would let their emotions interfere with the task of diplomacy, they were not up to the deadly risks that could arise overseas, and they would be unable to cultivate the social contacts vital to success in the field. The men of the State Department objected but had to admit women, including the first female ambassadors: Ruth Bryan Owen, Florence "Daisy" Harriman, Perle Mesta, Eugenie Anderson, Clare Boothe Luce, and Frances Willis. These were among the most influential women in US foreign relations in their era. Using newly available archival sources, Philip Nash examines the history of the "Big Six" and how they carved out their rightful place in history. After a chapter capturing the male world of American diplomacy in the early twentieth century, the book devotes one chapter to each of the female ambassadors and delves into a number of topics, including their backgrounds and appointments, the issues they faced while on the job, how they were received by host countries, the complications of protocol, and the press coverage they received, which was paradoxically favorable yet deeply sexist. In an epilogue that also provides an overview of the role of women in modern US diplomacy, Nash reveals how these trailblazers helped pave the way for more gender parity in US foreign relations.
Gender in Jewish Studies Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 164
ISBN: 9781463240561
Pub Date: 17 Oct 2019
Imprint: Gorgias Press
Series: Melilah: Manchester Journal of Jewish Studies (1759-1953)
Volume 13 of Melilah, an interdisciplinary electronic journal concerned with Jewish law, history, literature, religion, culture and thought in the ancient, medieval and modern eras.
Gateway to Equality Cover
Format: Hardback
Pages: 294
ISBN: 9780813168838
Pub Date: 28 Jul 2017
Imprint: University Press of Kentucky
Series: Civil Rights and the Struggle for Black Equality in the Twentieth Century
Like most of the nation during the 1930s, St. Louis, Missouri, was caught in the stifling grip of the Great Depression. For the next thirty years, the "Gateway City" continued to experience significant urban decline as its population swelled and the area's industries stagnated. Over these decades, many African American citizens in the region found themselves struggling financially and fighting for access to profitable jobs and suitable working conditions. To combat ingrained racism, crippling levels of poverty, and sub-standard living conditions, black women worked together to form a community-based culture of resistance -- fighting for employment, a living wage, dignity, representation, and political leadership. Gateway to Equality investigates black working-class women's struggle for economic justice from the rise of New Deal liberalism in the 1930s to the social upheavals of the 1960s. Author Keona K. Ervin explains that the conditions in twentieth-century St. Louis were uniquely conducive to the rise of this movement since the city's economy was based on light industries that employed women, such as textiles and food processing. As part of the Great Migration, black women migrated to the city at a higher rate than their male counterparts, and labor and black freedom movements relied less on a charismatic, male leadership model. This made it possible for women to emerge as visible and influential leaders in both formal and informal capacities. In this impressive study, Ervin presents a stunning account of the ways in which black working-class women creatively fused racial and economic justice. By illustrating that their politics played an important role in defining urban political agendas, her work sheds light on an unexplored aspect of community activism and illuminates the complexities of the overlapping civil rights and labor movements during the first half of the twentieth century.
The Dream Is Lost Cover
Format: Hardback
Pages: 360
ISBN: 9780813169484
Pub Date: 02 Jun 2017
Imprint: University Press of Kentucky
Series: Civil Rights and the Struggle for Black Equality in the Twentieth Century
Once the capital of the Confederacy and the industrial hub of slave-based tobacco production, Richmond, Virginia has been largely overlooked in the context of twentieth century urban and political history. By the early 1960s, the city served as an important center for integrated politics, as African Americans fought for fair representation and mobilized voters in order to overcome discriminatory policies. Richmond's African Americans struggled to serve their growing communities in the face of unyielding discrimination. Yet, due to their dedication to strengthening the Voting Rights Act of 1965, African American politicians held a city council majority by the late 1970s. In The Dream Is Lost, Julian Maxwell Hayter describes more than three decades of national and local racial politics in Richmond and illuminates the unintended consequences of civil rights legislation. He uses the city's experience to explain the political abuses that often accompany American electoral reforms and explores the arc of mid-twentieth-century urban history. In so doing, Hayter not only reexamines the civil rights movement's origins, but also seeks to explain the political, economic, and social implications of the freedom struggle following the major legislation of the 1960s. Hayter concludes his study in the 1980s and follows black voter mobilization to its rational conclusion -- black empowerment and governance. However, he also outlines how Richmond's black majority council struggled to the meet the challenges of economic forces beyond the realm of politics. The Dream Is Lost vividly illustrates the limits of political power, offering an important view of an underexplored aspect of the post--civil rights era.
A Rape in the Early Republic Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 136
ISBN: 9780813169521
Pub Date: 21 Mar 2017
Imprint: University Press of Kentucky
Series: New Directions in Southern History
On January 14, 1806, Sidney Hanson was raped by John Deskins on a rough gravel path in the woods in Tazewell County, Virginia. In the early nineteenth century, trials for rape were rare. Scanty court records typically lacked the detail needed to reconstruct the lives of those involved and evaluate the social and physical setting of the crime. Yet the events on that fateful day in 1806 would be the exception. In A Rape in the Early Republic, Randal L. Hall reproduces the complete trial testimony of Alexander Smyth, the prosecutor for Hanson's trial. Smyth's detailed record offers a revealing glimpse into how early rape cases moved through the legal system, first at the local level and then in the state's recently created district court system. It also shows that Deskins was not the only one on trial -- Hanson's character was being scrutinized as well. Hall's introduction, rather than offering an analysis of Smyth's documents, provides important context and highlights historical themes that Hanson's situation illustrates. Featuring classroom discussion ideas and a list of suggested reading, A Rape in the Early Republic will be a valuable resource for students and scholars as well as anyone interested in gender, law, and society in the early republic.
Collaborative Heritage Management Cover
Format: Hardback
Pages: 254
ISBN: 9781463205706
Pub Date: 02 Mar 2016
Imprint: Gorgias Press
Series: Regenerating Practices in Archaeology and Heritage
In this volume, practitioners within archaeology, anthropology, urban planning, human geography, cultural resource management (CRM) and museology push the boundaries of traditional cultural and natural heritage management and reflect how heritage discourse is being increasingly re-theorised in term of experience.
A Medieval Woman's Companion Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 176
ISBN: 9781785700798
Pub Date: 30 Nov 2015
Imprint: Oxbow Books
What have a deaf nun, the mother of the first baby born to Europeans in North America, and a condemned heretic to do with one another? They are among the virtuous virgins, marvellous maidens, and fierce feminists of the Middle Ages who trail-blazed paths for women today. Without those first courageous souls who worked in fields dominated by men, women might not have the presence they currently do in professions such as education, the law, and literature. Focusing on women from Western Europe between c. 300 and 1500 CE in the medieval period and richly carpeted with detail, A Medieval Woman’s Companion offers a wealth of information about real medieval women who are now considered vital for understanding the Middle Ages in a full and nuanced way. Short biographies of 20 medieval women illustrate how they have anticipated and shaped current concerns, including access to education; creative emotional outlets such as art, theatre, romantic fiction, and music; marriage and marital rights; fertility, pregnancy, childbirth, contraception and gynecology; sex trafficing and sexual violence; the balance of work and family; faith; and disability. Their legacy abides until today in attitudes to contemporary women that have their roots in the medieval period. The final chapter suggests how 20th and 21st century feminist and gender theories can be applied to and complicated by medieval women's lives and writings. Doubly marginalised due to gender and the remoteness of the time period, medieval women’s accomplishments are acknowledged and presented in a way that readers can appreciate and find inspiring. Ideal for high school and college classroom use in courses ranging from history and literature to women's and gender studies, an accompanying website with educational links, images, downloadable curriculum guide, and interactive blog will be made available at the time of publication.
Queer Crossings Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 195
ISBN: 9788857509396
Pub Date: 30 Sep 2014
Imprint: Mimesis International
Series: Sociology
The past decade has witnessed a proliferation of writings on queer theories and practices. Drawing together established and emerging scholars in the field, this volume offers a broad, transdisciplinary and international approach to queer studies. In the light of recent critical perspectives, it proposes a number of theoretical developments concerning three key thematic fields: theories, bodies and texts. The first section of the volume considers the embodied, sexed and gendered self and its problematic relation with queer theories, animal studies as well as with the representation of non-human and intersex identities. The second section explores a variety of modes of representation, and/or misrepresentation, of queer embodied subjectivities, ranging from literature to media and performance. In analysing a variety of classic and contemporary texts, the contributors call into question and reconceptualise key issues such as queer subjectivity, homophobia, gender performativity, masquerade and cross-dressing.
Appalachian Women Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 208
ISBN: 9780813152479
Pub Date: 15 Jul 2014
Imprint: University Press of Kentucky
Appalachian women have been the subject of song, story, and report for nearly two centuries. Now for the first time a fully annotated bibliography makes accessible this large body of literature. Works covered include novels, short stories, magazine articles, manuscripts, dissertations, surveys, and oral history tapes -- altogether over 1,200 items. The annotated listings are grouped under broad subject headings, including biography, coal mining, education, fiction, health care, industry, migrants, music, poetry, and religion. An author/title/subject index provides easy access to the listings.
A Woman's Wage Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 196
ISBN: 9780813145136
Pub Date: 27 May 2014
Imprint: University Press of Kentucky
Series: Blazer Lectures
In this updated edition of a groundbreaking classic, Alice Kessler-Harris explores the meanings of women's wages in the United States in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, focusing on three issues that capture the transformation of women's roles: the battle over minimum wage for women, which exposes the relationship between family ideology and workplace demands; the argument concerning equal pay for equal work, which challenges gendered patterns of self-esteem and social organization; and the debate over comparable worth, which seeks to incorporate traditionally female values into new work and family trajectories. Together, these topics illuminate the many ways in which gendered social meaning has been produced, transmitted, and challenged.
Women's Language Cover
Format: Hardback
Pages: 264
ISBN: 9789187121876
Pub Date: 19 Dec 2012
Imprint: Nordic Academic Press
Is there a special niche reserved for women's language? This is the theory tested empirically by the authors of Women's language, by means of an exhaustive stylistic analysis of a voluminous body of letters written in five different languages -- Latin, English, German, French, and Swedish -- from medieval times through to the long eighteenth century. In a detailed investigation of style and expression, the authors have applied a number of advanced methods of study to pinpoint how women expressed themselves to other women and whether they addressed themselves differently to men. Unveiling fascinating differences in language use, but none particular to female language, this authoritative work is a joy to follow for anyone interested in language, literature, stylistic analysis, and gender studies.
Antrocom: Journal of Anthropology (Vol 7) Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 202
ISBN: 9781463202125
Pub Date: 03 Nov 2012
Imprint: Gorgias Press
Series: Antrocom: Journal of Anthropology
AOJA is an multilingual European project that collect studies in the fields of physical and cultural anthropology, and of the disciplines related to. It offers original researches by scholars of merit and young researchers, with particular attention to proposals by Asian and developing countries authors.
Arab and Jewish Women in Kentucky Cover
Format: Hardback
Pages: 228
ISBN: 9780813136219
Pub Date: 29 Jun 2012
Imprint: University Press of Kentucky
Series: Kentucky Remembered: An Oral History Series
Outwardly it would appear that Arab and Jewish immigrants comprise two distinct groups with differing cultural backgrounds and an adversarial relationship. Yet, as immigrants who have settled in communities at a distance from metropolitan areas, both must negotiate complex identities. Growing up in Kentucky as the granddaughter of Jewish immigrants, Nora Rose Moosnick observed this traditionally mismatched pairing firsthand, finding that, Arab and Jewish immigrants have been brought together by their shared otherness and shared fears. Even more intriguing to Moosnick was the key role played by immigrant women of both cultures in family businesses -- a similarity which brings the two groups close together as they try to balance the demands of integration into American society. In Arab and Jewish Women in Kentucky: Stories of Audacity and Accomodation, Moosnick reveals how Jewish and Arab women have navigated the intersection of tradition, assimilation, and Kentucky's cultural landscape. The stories of ten women's experiences as immigrants or the children of immigrants join around common themes of public service to their communities, intergenerational relationships, running small businesses, and the difficulties of juggling family and work. Together, their compelling narratives challenge misconceptions and overcome the invisibility of Arabs and Jews in out of the way places in America.