Medieval World Hero Image
Medieval World
Les vikings Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 128
ISBN: 9782840484943
Pub Date: 28 Apr 2021
Imprint: Heimdal
This title, a perfect guide to the Viking age, offers an exhaustive survey of the archaeology and history of medieval Scandinavia during the eighth and ninth centuries. The author begins his historical tour at the twilight of the Iron Age in Germany as the foundations of Viking society can be found there. Rather than concentrating on the warrior aspects, he looks at differences within Scandinavian societies such as the art of war, the expansion of Scandinavia, writing, religion and how these societies functioned. These differences are demonstrated through objects from the Scandinavian sphere and numerous photographs of reconstructions of objects which help to visualise the life of the Norsemen.  
Medieval Military Combat Cover
Format: Hardback
Pages: 256
ISBN: 9781612008875
Pub Date: 15 Mar 2021
Imprint: Casemate Publishers
We don't know how medieval soldiers fought. Did they just walk forward in their armour, to smash each other with their maces and poleaxes, for hours on end, as depicted on film in programs such as Game of Thrones?   They could not have done so. It is impossible to fight in such a manner for more than several minutes as exhaustion becomes a preventative factor.   Indeed, we know more of how the Roman and Greek armies fought than we do of the 1300 to 1550 period.   So how did medieval soldiers in the War of the Roses, and in the infantry sections of battles such as Agincourt and Towton, carry out their grim work?   Medieval Military Combat looks at the techniques of such battles. It suggests that medieval battle numbers are highly exaggerated, and that we need to look again at the accounts of actions such as the famous Battle of Towton, which this work uses as a basic for its overall study.
Studies in the Roman and Medieval Archaeology of Exeter Cover
Format: Hardback
Pages: 656
ISBN: 9781789256192
Pub Date: 15 Mar 2021
Imprint: Oxbow Books
Series: Exeter: A Place in Time
This second volume presenting the research carried out through the Exeter: A Place in Time project presents a series of specialist contributions that underpin the general overview published in the first volume. Chapter 2 provides summaries of the excavations carried out within the city of Exeter between 1812 and 2019, while Chapter 3 draws together the evidence for the plan of the legionary fortress and the streets and buildings of the Roman town. Chapter 4 presents the medieval documentary evidence relating to the excavations at three sites in central Exeter (High Street, Trichay Street and Goldsmith Street), with the excavation reports being in Chapter 5-7. Chapter 8 reports on the excavations and documentary research at Rack Street in the south-east quarter of the city. There follows a series of papers covering recent research into the archaeometallurgical debris, dendrochronology, Roman pottery, Roman ceramic building material, Roman querns and millstones, Claudian coins, an overview of the Roman coins from Exeter and Devon, medieval pottery, and the human remains found in a series of medieval cemeteries.
Roman and Medieval Exeter and their Hinterlands Cover
Format: Hardback
Pages: 416
ISBN: 9781789256154
Pub Date: 15 Feb 2021
Imprint: Oxbow Books
Series: Exeter: A Place in Time
This first volume, presenting research carried out through the Exeter: A Place in Time project, provides a synthesis of the development of Exeter within its local, regional, national and international hinterlands. Exeter began life in c. AD 55 as one of the most important legionary bases within early Roman Britain, and for two brief periods in the early and late 60s AD, Exeter was a critical centre of Roman power within the new province. When the legion moved to Wales the fortress was converted into the civitas capital for the Dumnonii. Its development as a town was, however, relatively slow, reflecting the gradual pace at which the region as a whole adapted to being part of the Roman world. The only evidence we have for occupation within Exeter between the 5th and 8th centuries is for a church in what was later to become the Cathedral Close. In the late 9th century, however, Exeter became a defended burh, and this was followed by the revival of urban life. Exeter’s wealth was in part derived from its central role in the south-west’s tin industry, and by the late 10th century Exeter was the fifth most productive mint in England. Exeter’s importance continued to grow as it became an episcopal and royal centre, and excavations within Exeter have revealed important material culture assemblages that reflect its role as an international port.
The Wandering Herd Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 312
ISBN: 9781911188797
Pub Date: 15 Feb 2021
Imprint: Windgather Press
The British countryside is on the brink of change. With the withdrawal of EU subsidies, threats of US-style factory farming and the promotion of ‘rewilding’ initiatives, never before has so much uncertainty and opportunity surrounded our landscape. How we shape our prospective environment can be informed by bygone practice, as well as through engagement with livestock and landscapes long since vanished. This study examines aspects of pastoralism that occurred in part of medieval England. It suggests how we learn from forgotten management regimes to inform, shape and develop our future countryside.   This book focuses on a region of southern England the pastoral identity of which has long been synonymous with the economy of sheep pasture and the medieval right of swine pannage. These aspects of medieval pastoralism, made famous by iconic images of the South Downs and the evidence presented by Domesday, mask a pastoral heritage in which a signifi cant part was played by cattle. This aspect of medieval pastoralism is traceable in the region’s historic landscape, documentary evidence and excavated archaeological remains. Past scholars of the South-East have been so concerned with the importance of medieval sheep, and to a slightly lesser extent pigs, that no systematic examination of the cattle economy has ever been undertaken. This book therefore represents a deep, multi-disciplinary study of the cattle economy over the longue durée of the Middle Ages, especially its importance within the evolution of medieval society, settlement and landscape.   Nationally, medieval cattle have been one of the most important and neglected aspects of the agriculture of the medieval period. This book shows us how, as part of both a mixed and specialised farming economy, they have helped shapethe countryside we know today.
Everyday Life in Viking-Age Towns Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 272
ISBN: 9781789255461
Pub Date: 05 Jan 2021
Imprint: Oxbow Books
The study of early medieval towns has frequently concentrated on urban beginnings, the search for broadly applicable definitions of urban characteristics and the chronological development of towns. Far less attention has been paid to the experience of living in towns. The thirteen chapters in this book bring together the current state of knowledge about Viking-Age towns (c. 800–1100) from both sides of the Irish Sea, focusing on everyday life in and around these emerging settlements. What was it really like to grow up, live, and die in these towns? What did people eat, what did they wear, and how did they make a living for themselves? Although historical sources are addressed, the emphasis of the volume is overwhelmingly archaeological, paying homage to the wealth of new material that has become available since the advent of urban archaeology in the 1960s.
Viking Encounters Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 635
ISBN: 9788771842654
Pub Date: 15 Nov 2020
Imprint: Aarhus University Press
The Viking Congresses bring together scholars of archaeology, philology, history, toponymy, numismatics and a number of other disciplines to discuss the Viking Age from a variety of viewpoints. This volume contains 44 peer-reviewed papers selected from those presented at the 18th Viking Congress held in Denmark in August 2017. The contributors take up the interdisciplinary challenge, and the papers cover a wide range of subjects, rooted in the past, but also connecting to the present.
Exploring Celtic Origins Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 224
ISBN: 9781789255508
Pub Date: 01 Oct 2020
Imprint: Oxbow Books
Exploring Celtic Origins is the fruit of collaborative work by researchers in archaeology, historical linguistics, and archaeogenetics over the past ten years. This team works towards the goal of a better understanding of the background in the Bronze Age and Beaker Period of the people who emerge as Celts and speakers of Celtic languages documented in the Iron Age and later times. Led by Sir Barry Cunliffe and John Koch, the contributors present multidisciplinary chapters in a lively user-friendly style, aimed at accessibility for workers in the other fields, as well as general readers. The collection stands as a pause to reflect on ways forward at the moment of intellectual history when the genome-wide sequencing of ancient DNA (a.k.a. ‘the archaeogenetic revolution’) has suddenly changed everything in the study of later European prehistory. How do we deal with what appears to be an irreversible breach in the barrier between science and the humanities? Exploring Celtic Origins includes colour maps and illustrations and annotated Further Reading for all chapters.
Pecsaetna Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 144
ISBN: 9781911188681
Pub Date: 15 Aug 2020
Imprint: Windgather Press
This book is intended to pull together our current knowledge of the ‘lost’ group of people called the Pecsaetna (literally, meaning the ‘Peak Sitters’) by synthesising more recent historical and archaeological research towards a better understanding of their activities, territory and identity. This group of people is shrouded in the mists of the so-called ‘Dark Ages’ and are only known to us by the chance survival of less than a handful of documents.Since the mid-20th century, valuable work has been done to identify former Anglo-Saxon estates in the Peak from the analysis of charters and from the Domesday survey, together with recent wider historical analysis. In addition, some have also attempted reconstructions of geographical territories from the Tribal Hidage, the document, which first mentions the Pecsaetna. To this historical analysis can be added further archaeological evidence which ranges from Anglo-Saxon barrow investigation in the limestone Peak District, to studies into the geographical distributions of free-standing stone monuments of the Anglo-Saxon and Anglo-Scandinavian periods. It is this latter study that has prompted the writer to attempt this study.
Llangorse Crannog Cover
Format: Hardback
Pages: 512
ISBN: 9781789253061
Pub Date: 31 Dec 2019
Imprint: Oxbow Books
The crannog on Llangorse Lake near Brecon in mid Wales was discovered in 1867 and first excavated in 1869 by two local antiquaries, Edgar and Henry Dumbleton, who published their findings over the next four years. In 1988 dendrochronological dates from submerged palisade planks established its construction in the ninth century, and a combined off- and on-shore investigation of the site was started as a joint project between Cardiff University and Amgueddfa Cymru - National Museum Wales. The subsequent surveys and excavation (1989-1994, 2004) resulted in the recovery of a remarkable time capsule of life in the late ninth and tenth century, on the only crannog yet identified in Wales.   This publication re-examines the early investigations, describes in detail the anatomy of the crannog mound and its construction, and the material culture found. The crannog’s treasures include early medieval secular and religious metalwork, evidence for manufacture, the largest depository of early medieval carpentry in Wales and a remarkable richly embroidered silk and linen textile which is fully analysed and placed in context. The crannog’s place in Welsh history is explored, as a royal llys (‘court’) within the kingdom of Brycheiniog, as well as its subsequent significance of the crannog in local traditions and its post-medieval occupation during a riotous dispute in the reign Elizabeth I. The cultural affinities of the crannog and its material culture is assessed, as are their relationship to origin myths for the kingdom, and to probable links with early medieval Ireland. The folk tales associated with the lake are explored, in a book that brings together archaeology, history, myths and legends, underwater and terrestrial archaeology.
Burgen in umstrittenen Landschaften Cover Burgen in umstrittenen Landschaften Cover
Format: 
Pages: 444
ISBN: 9789088908682
Pub Date: 18 Dec 2019
Imprint: Sidestone Press
Pages: 444
ISBN: 9789088908675
Pub Date: 18 Dec 2019
Imprint: Sidestone Press
In ganz Europa bestimmten Burgen im hohen und späten Mittelalter die Herrschaftspraxis. Doch während dies in zahlreichen Regionen hinreichend Beachtung findet, wurde das südliche Jütland bislang weder von der Regionalgeschichts- noch von der Burgenforschung als Burgenlandschaft wahrgenommen. Dabei vermitteln Ortsnamen wie Sønderborg, Wallanlagen wie etwa in Tørning und nicht zuletzt Schlossanlagen wie Gottorf, dessen Ursprung auf eine mittelalterliche Burg zurückgeht, noch heute einen lebhaften Eindruck von der einstigen Bedeutung derartiger Anlagen.   Im Rahmen seines von 2014 bis 2018 an der Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel durchgeführten Forschungsvorhabens beschäftigte sich der Verfasser umfassend mit diesem Phänomen, und legt mit diesem Buch nun erstmals eine wissenschaftliche Studie zu den bislang kaum beachteten Burgen zwischen Eider und Kongeå vor. Auf einer Mikroebene werden Informationen zu den einzelnen Anlagen beiderseits der deutsch-dänischen Grenze aus verschiedenen Fachdisziplinen wie der Geschichtswissenschaft und Mittelalterarchäologie gesammelt, kritisch evaluiert und miteinander in Verbindung gesetzt. Die einzelnen Fallbeispiele werden anschließend auf einer Makroebene in ihren räumlichen und historischen Kontexten verortet. Die Arbeit orientiert sich dabei an jüngeren Tendenzen der internationalen Burgenforschung, welche die soziale Komplexität, landschaftliche Einbettung und funktionale Vielfalt der Burgen betonen. Insbesondere durch eine innovative Strukturierung in verschiedene Funktionstypen ergeben sich vollkommen neue methodische Zugänge zu den Burgen dieses Raumes.   Das Werk bildet insgesamt sieben Evolutionsphasen dieser historischen Burgenlandschaft ab, von den einfachen Anfängen des 12. Jahrhunderts bis zu den herrschaftlich komplexen und vielfältigen Strukturen des 15. Jahrhunderts. Es wird deutlich, dass zwar jede der insgesamt 58 nachweisbaren Burgen für sich betrachtet werden muss, diese jedoch nur in ihren historischen und landschaftlichen Bezügen sinnvoll gedeutet werden können. Somit versteht sich der Band als wichtiger Beitrag für ein differenzierteres Verständnis dieses vielschichtigen Herrschaftsraumes, der zugleich einen Referenzrahmen für weitere Untersuchungen bietet und die Region als Burgenlandschaft in der überregionalen Forschung platziert.   English abstract   Castles had a lasting influence on the practice of reign during the high and late Middle Ages throughout Europe. While this has received considerable attention for many regions, southern Jutland has not yet been perceived as a castle landscape neither by regional historians nor by castle research, although toponyms such as Sønderborg, ramparts like Tørning and palaces such as Gottorf, whose origin goes back to a medieval castle, still provides a vivid impression of the once important role played by such castles.   From 2014 to 2018, the author conducted a research project at Kiel University on this phenomenon. With this book, he now presents the first comprehensive study of the castles between Eider and Kongeå, which have received little attention so far. On a micro-level, information on the individual structures on both sides of the German-Danish border from various disciplines such as history and medieval archaeology is compiled, critically evaluated and interconnected. The individual case studies are then placed in their spatial and historical contexts on a micro-level. The work is primarily inspired by the latest trends in international castle research, which emphasize the social complexity, landscape embedding and functional diversity of castles. Especially an innovative classification into different function types allows for completely new methodological approaches to the castles of this region.   The book illustrates a total of seven evolutionary phases of this historical castle landscape, from the humble beginnings of the 12th century to the manorially complex and diverse structures of the 15th century. While it is evident that each of these 58 verifiable castles must be examined individually, they can only be meaningfully understood within their historical and landscape contexts. The volume thus sees itself as an important contribution to a more differentiated understanding of this complex territory, providing a frame of reference for further investigations and establishing the region as a castle landscape in supra-regional research.
Crafts and Social Networks in Viking Towns Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 288
ISBN: 9781789251609
Pub Date: 30 Nov 2019
Imprint: Oxbow Books
Crafts and Social Networks in Viking Towns explores the interface between craft, communication networks, and urbanisation in Viking-Age northern Europe. Viking-period towns were the hubs of cross-cultural communication of their age, and innovations in specialised crafts provide archaeologists with some of the best evidence for studying this communication. The integrated results presented in these papers have been made possible through the sustained collaboration of a group of experts with complementary insights into individual crafts. Results emerge from recent scholarly advances in the study of artefacts and production: first, the application of new analytical techniques (e.g. metallographic, isotopic, and biomolecular techniques) and second, the shift in interpretative focus from a concern with object function to considerations of processes of production, and of the social agency of technology. Furthermore, the introduction of social network theory and actor-network theory has redirected attention toward the process of communication, and highlighted the significance of material culture in the learning and transmission of cultural knowledge, including technology.   The volume brings together leading UK and Scandinavian archaeological specialists to explore crafted products and workshop-assemblages from Viking towns, in order to clarify how such long-range communication worked in pre-modern northern Europe. Contributors assess the implications for our understanding of early towns and the long-term societal change catalysed by them, including the initial steps towards commercial economies. Results are analysed in relation to social network theory, social and economic history, and models of communication, setting an agenda for further research. The volume provides a landmark statement on our knowledge of Viking-Age craft and communication.
The Glass Vessels of Anglo-Saxon England c. AD 650-1100 Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 192
ISBN: 9781789253726
Pub Date: 15 Nov 2019
Imprint: Oxbow Books
This volume combines a comprehensive exploration of all vessel glass from middle and late Anglo-Saxon England and a review of the early glass with detailed interpretation of its meaning and place in Anglo-Saxon society. Analysis of a comprehensive dataset of all known Anglo-Saxon vessel glass of middle Anglo-Saxon date as a group has enabled the first quantification of form, colour, and decoration, and provided the structure for a new typological, chronological and geographical framework. The quantification and comparison of the vessel glass fragments and their attributes, and the mapping of the national distribution of these characteristics (forms, colours and decoration types), both represent significant developments and create rich opportunities for the future. The geographical scope is dictated by the glass fragments, which are from settlements located along the coast from Northumbria to Kent and along the south coast to Southampton. Seven case studies of intra-site glass distribution reveal that the anticipated pattern of peripheral disposal alongside dining waste is widespread, although exceptions exist at the monastic sites at Lyminge, Kent, and Jarrow, Tyne and Wear. Overall, the research themes addressed are the glass corpus and its typology; glass vessels in Anglo-Saxon society; and glass vessels as an economic indicator of trade and exchange. Analysis reveals new understandings of both the glass itself and the role of glass vessels in the social and economic mechanisms of early medieval England.   There is currently no comprehensive work examining early medieval vessel glass, particularly the post sixth-century fragmentary material from settlements, and my monograph will fill that gap. The space is particularly noticeable when considering books on archaeological glass from England: the early medieval period is the only one with no reference volume; no recent, through and accessible source of information. The British Museum published a monograph entitled ‘Catalogue of Anglo-Saxon Glass in the British Museum’ in 2008, but as the title suggests it is a catalogue at heart, and of a collection of fifth and sixth century grave goods in a single museum. Chronologically, a volume on the subject would fill the space between various books on Roman glass from Britain and ‘Medieval glass vessels found in England c. AD 1200-1500’ by Rachel Tyson. This book on early medieval vessel glass and the contexts from which it came will also make a significant contribution to early medieval settlement studies and the archaeology of trade in this period: both are growth areas of scholarship and interest and vessel glass provides a new tool to address key debates in the field.
The Staffordshire Hoard Cover
Format: Hardback
Pages: 640
ISBN: 9781527233508
Pub Date: 01 Nov 2019
Imprint: Society of Antiquaries of London
Series: Reports of the Research Committee of the Society of Antiquaries of London
The Staffordshire Hoard: An Anglo-Saxon Treasure tells the story of the Staffordshire Hoard’s discovery and  acquisition, and the six-year research project that pieced its fragments back together, identified its objects and explored their manufacture. Key chapters discuss the decoration and meaning of the Hoard’s intricate ornament, the techniques of Anglo-Saxon craftsmen, the religious and historical background, and hoarding practice in Britain and Europe, to place this most exceptional find in context. Finally, the text explores the impact that the find has had locally, nationally and internationally in the twenty-first century.
A Norse Settlement in the Outer Hebrides Cover
Format: Hardback
Pages: 728
ISBN: 9781789250466
Pub Date: 31 Oct 2019
Imprint: Oxbow Books
Series: Bornais
The settlement at Bornais in the Western Isles of Scotland is one of the largest rural settlements known from the Norse period in Britain. It spans the period from the fifth to the fifteenth century AD when the Atlantic seaboard was subject to drastic changes. The islands were systematically ravaged by Viking raiders and then colonised by Norse settlers. In the following centuries the islanders were central to the emergence of the Kingdom of Man and the Isles, played a crucial role in the development of the Lordship of the Isles and were finally assimilated into the Kingdom of Scotland.   This volume explores the stratigraphic sequence uncovered by the excavation of Bornais mounds 2 and 2A. The excavation of mound 2 revealed a sequence of high status buildings that span the Norse occupation of the settlement. One of these houses, constructed at the end of the eleventh century AD, was a well preserved bow-walled longhouse and the careful excavation and detailed recording of the floor layers has revealed a wealth of finds that provides invaluable insight into the activities taking place in this building. The final house in this sequence is very different in form and use, and clearly indicates the increasing Scottish influence on the region at the beginning of the thirteenth century.   The excavation of mound 2A provides an insight into the less prestigious areas of the settlement and contributes a significant amount of evidence on the settlement economy. The area was initially cultivated before it became a settlement local and throughout its life a focus on agricultural activities, such as grain drying and processing, appears to have been important. In the thirteenth century the mound was occupied by a craftsman who produced composite combs, gaming pieces and simple tools.   The evidence presented in this volume makes a major contribution to the understanding of Norse Scotland and the colonisation of the North Atlantic in a period of dramatic transformations.