Archaeology  /  British Archaeology
Environmental Archaeology in Ireland Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 306
ISBN: 9781842172742
Pub Date: 10 Oct 2007
Imprint: Oxbow Books
Illustrations: illus and tables
Description:
This edited volume of 16 papers provides an introduction to the techniques and methodologies, approaches and potential of environmental archaeology within Ireland. Each of the 16 invited contributions focuses on a particular aspect of environmental archaeology and include such specialist areas as radiocarbon dating, dendrochronology, palaeoentomology, human osteoarchaeology, palynology and geoarchaeology, thereby providing a comprehensive overview of environmental archaeology within an Irish context. The inclusion of pertinent case studies within each chapter will heighten awareness of the profusion of high standard environmental archaeological research that is currently being undertaken on Irish material.
The Augustinian Priory of St Mary Merton, Surrey Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 296
ISBN: 9781901992700
Pub Date: 10 Oct 2007
Series: MoLAS Monograph
Description:
Excavations 1976-90 at the priory of St Mary Merton revealed much about the layout and development of this monastery from the 12th century to the Dissolution. Founded on its present site beside the Wandle river, c 11.3km south-west of London, in 1117, Merton was one of the most influential of all the English houses of regular canons, and was much favoured by Henry III.
Dungeness and Romney Marsh Cover
Format: Hardback
Pages: 240
ISBN: 9781842172889
Pub Date: 20 Sep 2007
Imprint: Oxbow Books
Illustrations: 135 b/w illus, 29 tabs
Description:
The Romney Marsh / Dungeness Foreland depositional complex comprises an extensive tract of marshland and associated sand and gravel barrier deposits, located in the eastern English Channel. This monograph presents the results of a programme of palaeoenvironmental investigation aimed at improving our understanding of this internationally-significant coastal landform. The focus is on the evidence for landscape change during the late Holocene, from c.
St Peter's, Barton-upon-Humber, Lincolnshire - A Parish Church and its Community Cover
Format: Hardback
Pages: 216
ISBN: 9781842172834
Pub Date: 29 May 2007
Imprint: Oxbow Books
Description:
The excavations at St Peter's church, Barton-upon-Humber, between 1978 and 1984 have yielded the largest collection of human remains in the UK, dating from the late tenth century to the mid-nineteenth. The twin aims of the project were to understand the architectural history and setting of this complex, multi-period building (Volume 1), and to recover a substantial sample of the population for palaeopathological study (Volume 2). An extensive programme of historical and topographical research also took place in order to set the archaeological evidence firmly in context.
Winchester Palace Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 192
ISBN: 9781901992656
Pub Date: 30 Mar 2007
Series: MoLAS Monograph
Illustrations: 81 illus, 42 tabs
Description:
Archaeological rescue excavations in Southwark between 1983 and 1990 uncovered parts of the London house of the medieval bishops of Winchester. The archaeological evidence, mainly from the east part of the site, is supplemented by detailed documentary evidence. The property developed from the mid 12th century into a palatial residence, based around an inner and an outer courtyard, and enclosed by a boundary wall.
From Studium to Station Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 112
ISBN: 9780904220407
Pub Date: 24 Mar 2007
Series: Oxford Archaeology Occasional Paper
Description:
This report presents the results of over 40 years of excavation, historic building survey and documentary research that has been carried out by Oxford Archaeology and others at the site of the Cistercian house of Rewley, a chantry founded in 1280. It became an abbey and stadium providing accommodation for monks studying at the university, and can therefore claim to be one of Oxford's earliest colleges. The railway station that subsequently occupied the site in 1851 followed the design of the Crystal Palace, built for the Great Exhibition, and was the last surviving representative of that internationally important building.
EAA 116: Excavations on the site of Norwich Cathedral Refectory, 2001-3 Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 101
ISBN: 9780905594446
Pub Date: 31 Dec 2006
Series: East Anglian Archaeology Monograph
Illustrations: 17 b/w and col pls
Description:
A campaign to improve visitor and education facilities at Norwh cathedral involved the construction of new buildings within the west and south ranges of the cloister, and led to excavation of the area where the medieval refectory once stood. This revealed archaeological evidence of the Late Saxon, medieval and post-medieval periods and forms the subject of this report. Excavation has confirmed the long-held supposition that this area of Norwich was populated during the Late Saxon period.
Landscape Community and Colonisation Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 317
ISBN: 9781902771670
Pub Date: 31 Dec 2006
Illustrations: b/w figs and pls
Description:
Oxbow says: From 1993, the North Somerset Levels Project sought to investigate the origins and development of this area of reclaimed coastal marshland during the first and second millennia AD. The inter-disciplinary approach taken has added archaeological (survey and excavation) data, palaeoenvironmental evidence, studies of documentary sources, architecture, cartography and field- and place-names, to what was already known about the historic landscape. This report, which publishes the findings of the project, examines local and regional changes and variations in the landscape, focusing on two major phases of exploitation, modification and transformation during the Roman and medieval periods.
Reclaiming the Marsh Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 179
ISBN: 9780954293857
Pub Date: 01 Dec 2006
Imprint: Pre-Construct Archaeology
Illustrations: b/w and col illus
Description:
A report on fieldwork carried out in a little investigated area of London just outside the city wall. The area known as Moorfields was waterlogged throughout the Middle Ages, only being reclaimed in the 16th century. Finds include evidence of Roman settlement up to the construction of the wall in the 3rd century, and evidence of the medieval use of the area for leisure activities, including ice-skating and for dumping waste.
Roman and Later Development East of the Forum and Cornhill Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 188
ISBN: 9781901992434
Pub Date: 18 Jun 2006
Series: MoLAS Monograph
Illustrations: 115 b/w illus, 33 tabs
Description:
Excavations in 1996-7 uncovered important new evidence for the development of the eastern part of the Roman Londinium, as well as medieval and later activity. Early Roman activity took place on sloping ground near a minor tributary of a small stream, known as the Lorteburn in the medieval period. First-century development included ditches and a scatter of timber buildings.
The Tower of London New Armouries Project Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 80
ISBN: 9780904220360
Pub Date: 12 Jun 2006
Series: Occasional Paper
Description:
The New Armouries was built against the medieval inner curtain wall at the Tower of London in 1663-4 as a small arms store, and was later used for displays of the Royal Armouries collections. On the opposite side of the curtain wall a range of buildings providing soldiers' houses was constructed in the mid 17th century. This was rebuilt as the Irish Barracks by Dugal Campbell in the 1750s, but was demolished during the 19th century.
The Medieval Postern Gate by the Tower of London Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 74
ISBN: 9781901992601
Pub Date: 25 May 2006
Series: MoLAS Monograph
Illustrations: 47 b/w illus, 29 tabs
Description:
This long-awaited publication elucidates a remarkable monument, now preserved in situ beside the Tower of London. Excavations at Tower Hill in 1979 uncovered substantial reamins of the medieval postern gate at the junction of the City's defensive wall and the moat of the Tower of London. The postern gate was constructed between 1297 and 1308, towards the close of the reign of Edward I.
The Mote of Mark Cover
Format: Hardback
Pages: 190
ISBN: 9781842172179
Pub Date: 12 May 2006
Imprint: Oxbow Books
Series: Oxbow Monographs
Illustrations: 8p of col pls, many b/w figs
Description:
The Mote of Mark is a low boss of granite rising from forty-five metres above the eastern shore of Rough Firth, where the Urr Water enters the Solway, between the villages of Kippford and Rockcliffe. The summit comprises a central hollow between two raised areas of rock and was formerly defended by a stone and timber rampart enclosing one third of an acre. The Mote of Mark appears to have first attracted the attention of antiquaries in the late eighteenth century, and first assumed national importance with Alexander Curle's major work in 1913.
Royal palace, abbey and town of Westminster on Thorney Island Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 224
ISBN: 9781901992502
Pub Date: 29 Mar 2006
Series: MoLAS Monograph
Illustrations: 144 mainly col illus, 56 tabs
Description:
The Palace and Abbey of Westminster provide one of the most familiar images in the world. From its beginnings on an island surrounded by the Rivers Thames and Tyburn more than 7000 years ago, the site became the most important centre of English history from the 11th century onwards. The palace, which started as one of many royal residences, became the principal home of the English monarchs until it was damaged by fire during the reign of Henry VIII.
Archaeology of the Wallingford Bypass, 1986-92 Cover
Format: Hardback
Pages: 264
ISBN: 9780947816674
Pub Date: 12 Mar 2006
Series: Thames Valley Landscapes Monograph
Illustrations: 70 illustrations, 22 plates
Description:
The site at Whitecross Farm, including timber structures located on the edge of the eyot, and a substantial midden and occupation deposit has been securely radiocarbon-dated to the late Bronze Age. The late Bronze Age artefact assemblages are suggestive of a high-status site, with a range of domestic and ritual activities represented. The bank of the Grim's Ditch earthwork was found to have preserved evidence of earlier settlement, dating to the Neolithic and Bronze Age, and a sequence of cultivation, including ard marks and 'cord-rig' cultivation ridges.
From Ice Age to Essex Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 64
ISBN: 9781901992618
Pub Date: 12 Feb 2006
Description:
This book presents a short history of human habitation in East London, based on archaeological findings at gravel sites between 1963 and 1999. To find the beginning of this story we have to go back half a million years, to the time when advancing ice sheets pushed the Thames southwards to its present course, depositing the river gravels that exist across East London today. Archaeological work on the East London gravels began when finds from gravel pits were given to local collectors and museums.