MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology)

In the last decade MOLA published over 90 academic and popular books and manuals, and has developed processes to ensure the highest standards. Publications include both English Heritage- and developer-funded work but have been joined by significant work for other clients, who are using MOLA as a publishing outlet for their own work.

MOLA's Monograph and Studies Series have in general developed a common structure: an introduction; a chronological narrative describing the site sequence interwoven with the specialists’ evidence; thematic chapters; conclusions; and appendices with supporting data which cater for the specialist reader; these data are supplemented by CD-ROMs and online resources. The integrated approach requires a high level of collaboration and dialogue among the project team, and a focus on strong research aims within regional and national research frameworks and strategies. The research aims are set out before fieldwork begins and are revised at the assessment stage. This approach is underpinned and facilitated by their in-house team, supplemented by experts based in academic institutions. It also requires high levels of IT expertise in their developing relational database and geographic information system (GIS). Quality assurance is essential, supported by MOLA's in-house Managing Editor. Finally the graphics and photography teams ensure high-quality illustrations and products that convey information with maximum clarity. The success of the integrated approach and the quality of the publications is conveyed in many positive reviews written by peers in archaeological journals and news items. As well as the many books MOLA also submit numerous articles to local, regional and national peer-reviewed journals. These papers are just as important to the publisher and their clients, and deliver the results of archaeological work to the target audience as required by both client and curator.In the last decade MOLA published over 90 academic and popular books and manuals, and has developed processes to ensure the highest standards. Publications include both English Heritage- and developer-funded work but have been joined by significant work for other clients, who are using MOLA as a publishing outlet for their own work.

A Research Framework for London Archaeology 2002

Format: Paperback
Pages: 120
ISBN: 9781901992298
Pub Date: 01 Dec 2002
Illustrations: b/w illus throughout
Description:
The future of London archaeology is the focus of this volume, which follows on from The Archaeology of Greater London (MoLAS 2000). It sets out aims for improving and facilitating research and managing the archaeological resource more effectively. What will be useful for non-specialists are the summaries and reviews of the evidence for the main chronological periods; Prehistory, Roman, Saxon, Medieval and post 1500.
Roman Defences and Medieval Industry Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 122
ISBN: 9781901992175
Pub Date: 01 Dec 2002
Series: MoLAS Monograph
Illustrations: 81 b/w illus
Description:
Excavations at the site of Baltic House uncovered evidence of occupation dating from Roman times onward. The earliest excavated feature was a Roman barrel-lined well dated AD 50-80 and containing the skulls of a horse and bull - perhaps a sacrificial offering. The well lay to the south of a large V-shaped ditch which formed part of a late 1st-century defensive boundary along the northeast side of the Roman settlement.
Excavations at 25 Cannon Street, City of London Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 73
ISBN: 9781901992229
Pub Date: 01 Dec 2001
Series: MoLAS Archaeology Studies Series
Illustrations: 51 b/w illus
Description:
This report provides a chronological account of excavation findings at 25 Cannon Street, supported by many illustrations and specialist contributions. The dig revealed a long sequence of occupation, and adds to findings made on the site in 1954. Redeposited pottery provided rare evidence for Middle Bronze Age activity in the area of the City of London.
Roman and Medieval Townhouses on the London Waterfront Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 140
ISBN: 9781901992212
Pub Date: 01 Dec 2001
Series: MoLAS Monograph
Illustrations: 74 b/w illus
Description:
The north bank of the Thames near Cannon Street Station was occupied by some of London's most prominent buildings in both the Roman and Medieval periods. Substantial stone walls revealed at the site in 1969 were initially interpreted as part of a Roman townhouse attached to the 'Governor's Palace' building complex to the west. In 1994-7 new excavations uncovered a prehistoric marsh, a riverside quay dated to AD 84 and a revetment constructed in c.
Bankside Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 68
ISBN: 9781901992120
Pub Date: 01 Dec 2000
Series: MoLAS Monograph
Illustrations: 35 b/w figs, 6 tables
Description:
The multi-period site of Benbow House lies next to the Thames, and is a fine example of the multifarious and colourful activities that took place in London over the centuries. The earliest extant evidence of human activity within the excavation area was an attempt at land consolidation in the 12th or 13th century. This was followed by three periods of building from the 13th century onwards.
The Big Dig Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 44
ISBN: 9781901992052
Pub Date: 01 Dec 1998
Illustrations: many colour photos and illus
Description:
The Jubilee Line extension runs through Westminster and north Southwark, traversing some of the most archaeologically sensitive areas of London. The tunnels themselves are so deep that they pass well below any archaeological remains, but there have to be a myriad of holes connecting the tunnels with the surface. This booklet accompanied by colour photographs gives a basic outline of the archaeological remains uncovered during the construction work, from prehistoric tools to a medieval abbey.

Merton Priory

Format: Paperback
Pages: 24
ISBN: 9780905174204
Pub Date: 01 Dec 1993
Illustrations: many col and b/w figs and pls
Description:
A guide book to Merton Priory, founded in 1117, containing information on the background history of its foundation, the Augustinian friars that lived there, their religious life and routine and what happened to the building during the Dissolution and to the present day. The excavations at the site, first undertaken in 1921, as well as recent excavations by the Museum of London, are described and the results discussed.