MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology)

In the last decade MOLA published over 90 academic and popular books and manuals, and has developed processes to ensure the highest standards. Publications include both English Heritage- and developer-funded work but have been joined by significant work for other clients, who are using MOLA as a publishing outlet for their own work.

MOLA's Monograph and Studies Series have in general developed a common structure: an introduction; a chronological narrative describing the site sequence interwoven with the specialists’ evidence; thematic chapters; conclusions; and appendices with supporting data which cater for the specialist reader; these data are supplemented by CD-ROMs and online resources. The integrated approach requires a high level of collaboration and dialogue among the project team, and a focus on strong research aims within regional and national research frameworks and strategies. The research aims are set out before fieldwork begins and are revised at the assessment stage. This approach is underpinned and facilitated by their in-house team, supplemented by experts based in academic institutions. It also requires high levels of IT expertise in their developing relational database and geographic information system (GIS). Quality assurance is essential, supported by MOLA's in-house Managing Editor. Finally the graphics and photography teams ensure high-quality illustrations and products that convey information with maximum clarity. The success of the integrated approach and the quality of the publications is conveyed in many positive reviews written by peers in archaeological journals and news items. As well as the many books MOLA also submit numerous articles to local, regional and national peer-reviewed journals. These papers are just as important to the publisher and their clients, and deliver the results of archaeological work to the target audience as required by both client and curator.In the last decade MOLA published over 90 academic and popular books and manuals, and has developed processes to ensure the highest standards. Publications include both English Heritage- and developer-funded work but have been joined by significant work for other clients, who are using MOLA as a publishing outlet for their own work.

From Ice Age to Essex Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 64
ISBN: 9781901992618
Pub Date: 12 Feb 2006
Description:
This book presents a short history of human habitation in East London, based on archaeological findings at gravel sites between 1963 and 1999. To find the beginning of this story we have to go back half a million years, to the time when advancing ice sheets pushed the Thames southwards to its present course, depositing the river gravels that exist across East London today. Archaeological work on the East London gravels began when finds from gravel pits were given to local collectors and museums.
Roman Pottery Production in the Walbrook Valley Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 221
ISBN: 9781901992557
Pub Date: 24 Jan 2006
Series: MoLAS Monograph
Illustrations: 186 col and b/w illus, 33 tabs
Description:
Excavations have uncovered important new evidence of the second century AD Roman pottery industry, with up to eight kilns and a probable potters' workshop recorded on the west side of a major tributary of the Walbrook stream. Two distinct phases of production can be seen, and a stock of unused Samian ware from a pit suggests that pottery may have been sold in a shop attached to the production centre. The pottery industry went into decline in the latter half of the second century, though scattered structures, pitting and dumping were associated with the site in the third and fourth centuries.
Saxon, Medieval and Post-Medieval Settlement at Sol Central, Marefair, Northampton Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 81
ISBN: 9781901992571
Pub Date: 24 Jan 2006
Series: MoLAS Monograph
Illustrations: 76 b/w illus, 31 tabs, CD
Description:
Excavation work by Northamptonshire Archaeology and MoLAS revealed residual prehistoric and Roman artefacts and Middle Saxon settlement evidence in the form of a single sunken-floored building. Activity intensified in the Late Saxon to Norman period, when metalworking, crop processing and bone working took place at the site. The establishment of buildings suggests the main Saxon settlement around St Peter's Church spread northeastwards towards the limits of the town.
Prehistoric Landscape to Roman Villa Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 135
ISBN: 9781901992564
Pub Date: 22 Jul 2005
Series: MoLAS Monograph
Illustrations: 85 col and b/w illus
Description:
Excavations at Beddington have uncovered a long occupation sequence which includes Late Bronze Age or Early Iron Age fields, a Late Iron Age enclosed settlement and early Roman finds. A villa was established at the site in the late 2nd century AD and included a house, bathhouse and five other buildings, two of which were barns, although there was no direct evidence of crop or livestock production. In the late 3rd century AD wings were added to the house, the bathhouse was modified and the barns were replaced by a large aisled structure.
Holy Trinity Priory, Aldgate, City of London Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 285
ISBN: 9781901992458
Pub Date: 20 Jul 2005
Series: MoLAS Monograph
Illustrations: 214 b/w and col illus
Description:
This is an archaeological, architectural and historical study of one of the largest complexes of buildings in the medieval City of London, but one which is largely unknown and of which only two fragments survive above ground today. It is the fifth volume in a series on the monasteries of London. Holy Trinity Priory, Aldgate, was the first religious house to be established inside the walls of London after the Norman Conquest, in 11078; one of the earliest Augustinian houses to be established in England; and the first to be dissolved, in 1532.
Archaeology of the Jubilee Line extension Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 56
ISBN: 9781901992540
Pub Date: 05 May 2005
Illustrations: 41 b/w illus
Description:
Excavation ahead of redevelopment by London Underground Limited uncovered flint tools and debitage characteristic of the Mesolithic and Neolithic periods and Early Bronze Age. Activity resumed in the Late Bronze Age. A neonate skeleton of Early Iron Age date was recovered from a rubbish pit near a probable roundhouse.
Cistercian Abbey of St Mary Stratford Langthorne, Essex Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 198
ISBN: 9781901992380
Pub Date: 12 Dec 2004
Series: MoLAS Monograph
Illustrations: b/w and col illus
Description:
The Cistercian monastery of St Mary Stratford Langthorne once stood on land south of the new Jubilee Line station at Stratford. Excavations 1973-94 recorded large parts of the monastic church, cemetery and related buildings. Topics include the precinct arrangement, architecture and decoration, and the way of life of the inhabitants.
Life and Death in London's East End Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 100
ISBN: 9781901992496
Pub Date: 12 Dec 2004
Illustrations: col pls
Description:
In 1991 Spitalfields Market in London's East End was relocated, paving the way for one of the largest and most complex excavations ever launched in London, taking place on a site measuring almost thirteen acres. This superb book tells the story of the excavation and the 2000-year history of the area from the Roman period to the present day. Details on the finds recovered, and the methods and recording systems used, are interspersed with a narrative history of the site.
Pre-Boudican and later activity on the site of the forum Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 67
ISBN: 9781901992533
Pub Date: 12 May 2004
Series: MoLAS Archaeology Studies Series
Description:
New evidence of Londinium’s pre-Boudican origins and its first and second fora has been found at a site on Cornhill. In the AD 50s commercial or military storage buildings were established, including a granary, with a marketplace or open public area to the west.The Boudican fire and its aftermath were followed by construction of the south wing of the first forum in the AD 70s.
Roman and medieval Cripplegate, City of London Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 160
ISBN: 9781901992427
Pub Date: 20 Mar 2004
Series: MoLAS Monograph
Illustrations: 93 b/w illus, 22 tables
Description:
This volume presents the results of work from five separate developer-funded excavations between 1992-8. Bronze Age field ditches were sealed by domestic buildings relating to the expansion of early Roman London after AD 70, contemporary with the timber amphitheatre located nearby beneath the Guildhall. The masonry fort was built in the early 2nd century AD and there was no evidence of a long-suspected predecessor.
Medieval and later urban development at High Street, Uxbridge Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 80
ISBN: 9781901992373
Pub Date: 01 Feb 2004
Series: MoLAS Archaeology Studies Series
Illustrations: 52 b/w illus, 16 tables
Description:
The excavations at the Chimes Shopping Centre, have given archaeologists the opportunity to trace the development of the Medieval town of Uxbridge. The central part of the town was set out during the 12th century, perhaps as a planned extension of an existing Saxon hamlet. The borough ditch, which marked the boundary of the town, follows the line of George Street.
Urban Development in North-west Roman Southwark Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 208
ISBN: 9781901992335
Pub Date: 15 Dec 2003
Series: MoLAS Monograph
Illustrations: 125 b/w figs, 65 tabs
Description:
The river crossing and access to the River Thames were major influences on the siting of Roman Southwark, where Watling Street and Stane Street converged. Excavations at Courage's Brewery revealed an archaeological sequence dating back to Prehistoric times. The Roman remains begin from AD40-55 and show the development of the site from the 1st to the 4th centuries, as the area increased in wealth before the occupation phase ended to be replaced with a cemetery.
Industry in North-west Roman Southwark Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 186
ISBN: 9781901992342
Pub Date: 15 Dec 2003
Series: MoLAS Monograph
Illustrations: 112 b/w figs, 90 tabs
Description:
This volume is the second of several volumes presenting previously unpublished findings relating to Roman Southwark. This looks at an extensive sequence of Roman metalworking workshops and hearths, from the late 1st-late 4th centuries AD. The book is split into discussions of the metalworking industry, the period covered, and an analysis of the finds and is extensively illustrated throughout.
Roman Burials, Medieval Tenements and Suburban Growth Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 88
ISBN: 9781901992410
Pub Date: 15 Dec 2003
Series: MoLAS Archaeology Studies Series
Illustrations: 69 b/w illus, 23 tabs
Description:
The excavation at 201 Bishopsgate in 1998-9 uncovered evidence for Londinium's northern cemetery, roadside occupation along Roman Ermine Street, and medieval and later development to the west of Bishopsgate. This area has been extensively used and re-used, from burials to refuse-disposal to houses, as London has expanded. This volume documents the excavation with many pictures and tables, as well as extensive descriptions and discussions of the excavation at each stage.
Early Modern Industry and Settlement Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 92
ISBN: 9781901992359
Pub Date: 15 Dec 2003
Series: MoLAS Archaeology Studies Series
Illustrations: 76 b/w figs, 20 tabs
Description:
This richly illustrated volume presents important new evidence for early modern industry and settlement at two sites in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames. Taken together, the Richmond and Mortlake sites provide valuable evidence of the great increase in development occurring in small towns on the outskirts of London from the mid 17th century. Excavation at 29-34 George St, Richmond also drew on a historical study of documentary evidence, showing the town's development from the 15th century onwards.
Settlement in Roman Southwark Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 316
ISBN: 9781901992281
Pub Date: 12 Feb 2003
Series: MoLAS Monograph
Illustrations: 116 b/w & col illus, 148 tbs
Description:
The latest in a series of reports on the archaeological excavations near London Bridge Station, this volume focuses on important discoveries relating to the origins and development of Roman Southwark. From the prehistoric period on this area formed the northernmost end of a series of sandy islands in the tidal reaches of the Thames. The earliest Roman features were drainage ditches and quarry pits associated with the construction of a road to the Thames bridgehead.