MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology)

In the last decade MOLA published over 90 academic and popular books and manuals, and has developed processes to ensure the highest standards. Publications include both English Heritage- and developer-funded work but have been joined by significant work for other clients, who are using MOLA as a publishing outlet for their own work.

MOLA's Monograph and Studies Series have in general developed a common structure: an introduction; a chronological narrative describing the site sequence interwoven with the specialists’ evidence; thematic chapters; conclusions; and appendices with supporting data which cater for the specialist reader; these data are supplemented by CD-ROMs and online resources. The integrated approach requires a high level of collaboration and dialogue among the project team, and a focus on strong research aims within regional and national research frameworks and strategies. The research aims are set out before fieldwork begins and are revised at the assessment stage. This approach is underpinned and facilitated by their in-house team, supplemented by experts based in academic institutions. It also requires high levels of IT expertise in their developing relational database and geographic information system (GIS). Quality assurance is essential, supported by MOLA's in-house Managing Editor. Finally the graphics and photography teams ensure high-quality illustrations and products that convey information with maximum clarity. The success of the integrated approach and the quality of the publications is conveyed in many positive reviews written by peers in archaeological journals and news items. As well as the many books MOLA also submit numerous articles to local, regional and national peer-reviewed journals. These papers are just as important to the publisher and their clients, and deliver the results of archaeological work to the target audience as required by both client and curator.In the last decade MOLA published over 90 academic and popular books and manuals, and has developed processes to ensure the highest standards. Publications include both English Heritage- and developer-funded work but have been joined by significant work for other clients, who are using MOLA as a publishing outlet for their own work.

Early and Middle Saxon Rural Settlement in the London Region Cover
Format: Hardback
Pages: 240
ISBN: 9781901992779
Pub Date: 12 Nov 2008
Series: MoLAS Monograph
Description:
Until now the evidence for London's Early and Middle Saxon rural settlement and economy has received scant attention. This monograph provides a long-awaited overview of the subject, drawing on the results of six decades of archaeological fieldwork since the war, in addition to historical and place-name evidence. Some of the material has been published before and will be familiar to the reader, but much of it has only been available as site archives or unpublished reports, and at best briefly summarised as notes in excavation round-ups.
St Marylebone Church and Burial Ground in the 18th to 19th Centuries Cover
Format: Hardback
Pages: 172
ISBN: 9781901992793
Pub Date: 12 Nov 2008
Series: MoLAS Monograph
Description:
St Marylebone parish grew from humble beginnings on the city's margins to become, in the 18th and 19th centuries, one of the wealthiest in London, home to the elite and fashionable. The small parish church on Marylebone High Street, built in brick in 1742 on the site of the medieval church, was inadequate for such a congregation and was superceded in 1817 by today's far grander edifice on Marylebone Road. Archaeological investigations in 1992 showed that the graveyard - levelled in the 1930s for a playground for St Marylebone Church of England School for Girls - lay substantially undisturbed beneath the playground.
Burial at the Site of the Parish Church of St Benet Sherehog Before and After the Great Fire Cover
Format: Hardback
Pages: 112
ISBN: 9781901992755
Pub Date: 09 Apr 2008
Series: MoLAS Monograph
Description:
Archaeological work at 1 Poultry includes analysis of 280 burials associated with the medieval church of St Benet Sherehog and a post-Great Fire burial ground on the same location. Post-medieval coffins and coffin furniture indicate that the burial population is primarily late, with a fifth dated to before the Great Fire, although none were associated with the primary phase of the church. The parish of St Benet Sherehog pre- and post-Fire is considered in terms of the documented population, occupations and wealth, and health and mortality.
A Roman Drainage Culvert, Great Fire Destruction Debris and Other Evidence from Hillside Sites North-East of London Bridge Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 79
ISBN: 9781901992694
Pub Date: 24 Jan 2008
Series: MoLAS Archaeology Studies Series
Description:
Two 1998 excavations provide important new evidence of Roman and later development on the terraced ground north of the Thames and south of Cornhill. The Monument House site lay just north-east of the Roman bridgehead, immediately behind river quays and warehouses. First-century landscaping and gravel quarries were followed by timber buildings.
Within These Walls Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 193
ISBN: 9781901992687
Pub Date: 19 Dec 2007
Series: MoLAS Monograph
Description:
Roman and later activity was recorded north of Newgate, with the Roman defensive wall and a medieval bastion preserved in the new development. Stream channels gave way to early Roman settlement, with the city's defensive wall built in the late 2nd century AD. The defensive ditch was redug in the Late Saxon period and the Roman wall repaired, with the area becoming the site of the Greyfriars Friary in 1225.
The London Guildhall Cover
Format: Hardback
Pages: 536
ISBN: 9781901992724
Pub Date: 12 Dec 2007
Series: MoLAS Monograph
Description:
The Guildhall has been the centre of the local government of the City of London since the 12th century. Major archaeological excavations took place between 1985 and 1999, and evidence from these is combined with historical and architectural analysis to create an integrated history of the Guildhall. Beginning with the first hall of the 12th century, the book describes later halls and precinct buildings from the 14th to the 20th centuries.
Roman Waterfront Development at 12 Arthur Street, City of London Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 78
ISBN: 9781901992625
Pub Date: 12 Dec 2007
Series: MoLAS Archaeology Studies Series
Description:
Archaeological excavations at 12 Arthur Street in 2001-2 produced new evidence for the Roman riverfront development which constitutes an important addition to our knowledge of Roman London's foreshore, its waterfront, quays and buildings. This study brings to light new evidence for the Claudian waterfront and construction of the terracing along the natural slope of the riverbank. Post-Boudican and Hadrianic developments included the construction of two, more solid, timber quays built in c.
Late 17th- to 19th-Century Burial and Earlier Occupation at All Saints, Chelsea Old Church, Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 69
ISBN: 9781901992731
Pub Date: 12 Dec 2007
Series: MoLAS Archaeology Studies Series
Description:
Excavations at 2-4 Old Church Street revealed prehistoric activity, a Roman rural settlement, and medieval gardens and domestic occupation associated with a medieval manor house, although most of the evidence for settlement related to the post-medieval period, when Chelsea changed from a village to a riverside resort and finally a suburb. A churchyard occupied the southern half of the site; here were recovered the skeletons of 290 parishioners buried between c.1700 and the mid 19th century, including two members of the Hand family who ran the Chelsea Bun House.
Development on Roman London's Western Hill Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 132
ISBN: 9781901992663
Pub Date: 30 Oct 2007
Series: MoLAS Monograph
Illustrations: 116 illus, 28 tabs
Description:
Redevelopment of Paternoster Square in 2000-2001 provided the opportunity to reassess 1960s work at the site and review Roman activity on the western hill, south of the main east-west road from London to Silchester. Natural stream channels recorded at Paternoster and nearby sites drained south-westwards towards the Fleet river, rather than to the Thames as had been previously thought. The earliest Roman activity was associated with the c.
The Augustinian Priory of St Mary Merton, Surrey Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 296
ISBN: 9781901992700
Pub Date: 10 Oct 2007
Series: MoLAS Monograph
Description:
Excavations 1976-90 at the priory of St Mary Merton revealed much about the layout and development of this monastery from the 12th century to the Dissolution. Founded on its present site beside the Wandle river, c 11.3km south-west of London, in 1117, Merton was one of the most influential of all the English houses of regular canons, and was much favoured by Henry III.
Winchester Palace Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 192
ISBN: 9781901992656
Pub Date: 30 Mar 2007
Series: MoLAS Monograph
Illustrations: 81 illus, 42 tabs
Description:
Archaeological rescue excavations in Southwark between 1983 and 1990 uncovered parts of the London house of the medieval bishops of Winchester. The archaeological evidence, mainly from the east part of the site, is supplemented by detailed documentary evidence. The property developed from the mid 12th century into a palatial residence, based around an inner and an outer courtyard, and enclosed by a boundary wall.
Becoming Roman Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 73
ISBN: 9781901992670
Pub Date: 01 Dec 2006
Series: MoLAS Archaeology Studies Series
Description:
Occupation along the east side of the Ouzel valley included a Late Iron Age field system and a cremation cemetery, with Catuvellauni funerary traditions continuing into the Roman post-conquest period. Later 1st-century AD fields, timber structures and a large enclosure were associated with farming near Roman Watling Street. The enclosure, relocated to the valley floor, was expanded in the late Roman period to include masonry corn driers or malting ovens, with an enlarged enclosure established on the valley ridge.
Roman and Later Development East of the Forum and Cornhill Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 188
ISBN: 9781901992434
Pub Date: 18 Jun 2006
Series: MoLAS Monograph
Illustrations: 115 b/w illus, 33 tabs
Description:
Excavations in 1996-7 uncovered important new evidence for the development of the eastern part of the Roman Londinium, as well as medieval and later activity. Early Roman activity took place on sloping ground near a minor tributary of a small stream, known as the Lorteburn in the medieval period. First-century development included ditches and a scatter of timber buildings.
Roman and Medieval Development South of Newgate Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 84
ISBN: 9781901992588
Pub Date: 15 Jun 2006
Series: MoLAS Archaeology Studies Series
Illustrations: 64 b/w illus, 23 tabs
Description:
Important new evidence of Londons 2nd-century AD Roman pottery industry has been found along the western side of a tributary of the Walbrook stream. Up to eight kilns, producing Verulamium region white ware, and a probable potters workshop represent two phases of production. The findings indicate that much of the pottery thought to have been produced outside the settlement may come from these kilns.
The Medieval Postern Gate by the Tower of London Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 74
ISBN: 9781901992601
Pub Date: 25 May 2006
Series: MoLAS Monograph
Illustrations: 47 b/w illus, 29 tabs
Description:
This long-awaited publication elucidates a remarkable monument, now preserved in situ beside the Tower of London. Excavations at Tower Hill in 1979 uncovered substantial reamins of the medieval postern gate at the junction of the City's defensive wall and the moat of the Tower of London. The postern gate was constructed between 1297 and 1308, towards the close of the reign of Edward I.
Royal palace, abbey and town of Westminster on Thorney Island Cover
Format: Paperback
Pages: 224
ISBN: 9781901992502
Pub Date: 29 Mar 2006
Series: MoLAS Monograph
Illustrations: 144 mainly col illus, 56 tabs
Description:
The Palace and Abbey of Westminster provide one of the most familiar images in the world. From its beginnings on an island surrounded by the Rivers Thames and Tyburn more than 7000 years ago, the site became the most important centre of English history from the 11th century onwards. The palace, which started as one of many royal residences, became the principal home of the English monarchs until it was damaged by fire during the reign of Henry VIII.